2021-2022 Course Catalog – Humanities: English

◄ Indiana Graduation Pathways

Humanities: English

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required Courses

Every junior must take American Literature the fall semester and World Literature the spring semester.

ENG03101
American Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The American Literature course begins with literature of the New World and ends with contemporary period literature. There is an emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period, depending on the approach of the teacher. Students will have a wide variety of writing assignments, opportunities for oral participation, and other activities connecting literature, history, and culture.

ENG04221
World Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: ENG3101
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course focuses on the study of poetry, drama, and prose produced by authors of various nationalities of the Western and Eastern worlds from the ancient period to the present. Students explore literary movements and intellectual trends with a continuing emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. They also develop essays and projects that call upon the processes of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation and have opportunities for oral participation. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period depending on the approach of the teacher.

Electives: Dramatic Literature

ENG05139
Introduction to Theater and Dramatic Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

Introduction to Theater and Dramatic Literature begins with a study of ancient Greek Theater with particular stress on the nature of tragedy and the principles for tragedy (and drama) proposed by Aristotle in The Poetics. The plays Agamemnon, Antigone, and The Trojan Women represent the three major Greek playwrights. The course continues with Roman Theater, primarily the development of Farce and Senecan tragedy. Everyman is a major work of the Medieval Period, followed by Doctor Faustus as the representative work of the Renaissance. Molière (French comedy) and English Restoration Comedy are considered. The course then takes a short leap to consider the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, the Russian playwright Anton Chekov, and two British writers, G.B Shaw and Oscar Wilde. The American triumvirate of Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams are represented, followed by works of Samuel Beckett, Athol Fugard, August Wilson, and David Mamet. In addition to studying the plays as literature, the course includes an emphasis on staging and performance practices of each era and the cultures that helped inspire the plays. Although not an acting or a production course, some acting and some attention to stage design (setting and costumes) are included.

ENG05140
Global Cinema (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

Global Cinema provides students with the opportunity to explore the art of film in a global context. Students will analyze the preoccupations and methodologies of filmmakers and their films from nations like France, Germany, Taiwan, Sweden, India, the Czech Republic, and Mexico. Studying the moving image is akin to studying poetry, and students will be asked to challenge and expand their visual literacy and critical thinking skills. We will study materials in film and art theory, philosophy, and cultural studies, and write thesis-based analytical papers in which we apply theory to film analysis and confront the fictions and non-fictions of worlds beyond our own. In doing so, we will have the chance to see and to understand ourselves better. The course may have guest lecturers from other departments, like language and history, and, when possible, we will screen films in a BSU screening room.

Electives: Themes in Literature:

ENG05103
Literature of the Holocaust (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course offers students the opportunity to investigate a selection of Holocaust literature, including the genres of non-fiction, fiction, poetry, theory and philosophy, and film. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss the question of why the Holocaust should still have relevance to those growing up in the new Millennium, despite the fact that those who witnessed and experienced it have nearly all died. Through an investigation that begins with Hitler’s rise to power, we will analyze the structures of power and subjugation that allowed over six million people to be murdered. We will discuss at length the questions of memory, forgetting, and forgiveness. We will seek to negotiate the very troubling issue of the appropriation of someone else’s experience and motivations for doing so. Group viewings and discussions of films will generate further conversation and ideally lead us to a better understanding of the Holocaust and our individual responsibilities in remembering, forgetting, and passing on the stories of its victims.

ENG05106
African-American Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course explores the roots of African-American literature and the literary portrayal of the African-American experience in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Through the themes of the African-American struggle for voice, identity and power, the course examines various writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry. Students analyze folktales, slave narratives, poetry, short stories, and novels by such authors as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison. Literary works are contextualized in sociology and politics, and themes of representation and protest are analyzed in the context of broader human, spiritual, and intellectual themes. Attention to visual arts and music may enhance understanding of African-American history and culture.

ENG05117
Critical Approaches to Literature, Freudian and Jungian (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This literary criticism course uses Freudian and Jungian psychology to analyze literature that focuses on the theme of the dual personality. Students delve into what is often labeled as true self vs. the false self, the concept of the “double,” ego vs. alter ego or mirroring personalities, and id, ego, and super-ego. Through psychological and archetypal analysis, the course examines different writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry. The theories of Freud and Jung are employed to analyze such literary works as Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Frankenstein, Winesburg, Ohio, A Doll’s House, The Metamorphosis, Lord of the Flies, Heart of Darkness, Faust, The Picture of Dorian Grey, Demian, and Beloved. Students investigate psychological motives, unconscious desires and anxieties, myths and dreams as symbolic projections of people’s hopes, fears, and aspirations as they analyze the underlying human behavior of classical literary characters.

ENG05133
Poetry (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

In this course, students read and analyze poems written in English from the seventh through the twenty-first centuries, organized around such themes as family, nature, love, death, religious experience, and the imagination. Through discussion, formal and informal writing assignments, oral presentations, and a major project, students should develop as analytic and imaginative thinkers and writers while they learn to read poetry with greater understanding and pleasure. Traditional poetic themes are used with written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking for investigation and inquiry.

ENG051383
Studies in the Novel (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

In this course, students will learn about the development of the novel, while sharpening their critical thinking, analytical writing, and close-reading skills. We will examine the way writers from a variety of backgrounds and literary periods transform the novel by exploring new subject matter and form and subverting or building on existing literary traditions. Oral participation, daily reading responses, and literary analysis papers will challenge students to read closely, identify important themes and concepts, assert thesis claims, and prove their arguments through detailed analysis of textual evidence.

Electives: Other

ENG05111S1
Linguistics (DC)

Prerequisite: One year of world languages with a minimum grade of B or above.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This one semester course is an introduction to the nature of language and analysis of language structures and patterns. The course surveys major areas of linguistics such as semantics, syntax, and morphology. It also explores the social, psychological, and cultural aspects of language and engages students in creative and analytical writing. By the end of the course, the students should develop a sharper ear for language, a deeper understanding of its nature, and a livelier interest in all of its manifestations. Students are acquainted with the basic concepts necessary to further their linguistic studies.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in ENG 320 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

ENG05113S1/05113S2
Creative Writing (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Please note: Students may enroll in Writing Fiction or Creative Writing at the Academy, but not both.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

Students in this one semester class write poetry, short stories, plays, and creative non-fiction with opportunities for oral participation. The concept of manipulation of language to convey ideas, feelings, moods, and visual images is the basis of the course. The students become familiar with the standard literary elements through the reading and study of published prose and poetry and are taught to use those elements in their own writing. They learn strategies for evaluating their own writing and the writing of others. Students who are interested in an audience for their creative work and suggestions for improvement and development of their literary styles are encouraged to sign up for this course.

ENG05123/05124
AP English Language and Composition (CL)

Prerequisite: Permission of English Department. In keeping with College Board policy, this course is open to students who are academically prepared for it. Students prepared to benefit from this rigorous course have already shown an excellent work ethic and strong analytic and academic writing ability.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall/Spring Sequence

This year-long course, which prepares students to take the AP English Language and Composition exam, requires students to compose timed, evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays, written in response to College Board prompts, as well as to complete many informal writing exercises. Students will also conduct research, work on grammar and style, and learn to analyze the rhetorical strategies in visual texts and in non-fiction writing from many disciplines and historical periods.

Electives: English Quarter Courses

ENG05118
The Short Story (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

The short story is sometimes an under-appreciated art form. Within the space of a few pages, an author must weave a story that is compelling, create characters readers care about and drive the story to its ultimate conclusion. This short story quarter course will include many of the best short story writers of all time, authors who have mastered the art of the short story, turning condensed pieces into memorable works of literature. Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories written in English or famous works that have been translated into English including major authors such as Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Cather, Ellison, Hughes, Hemingway, Faulkner, Anderson, O’Conner, Salinger, Vonnegut, Munro, Mansfield, Erdrich, Alexie, Conrad, Joyce, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Borges, Garcia, Kafka, and many more.

ENG05141
Speculative Fiction (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

Speculative Fiction will engage with prevailing questions of society, identity, history and technology through the lens of science fiction, fantasy, horror and other genres. It will explore how literature uses provocative premises to engage in thought experiments and social critique. It will focus on key topics which will be addressed through a sequence of works, emphasizing comparative analysis and a variety of perspectives. Throughout the class we will engage in discussion and debate about the daily readings and their subject matter, produce analytical work about the material, and develop our own speculative topics which reflect the experiences and concerns which are most relevant to us.

This course is counted as an Academy elective course.

HUM02999
Writing Lab (CP)

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 1 or 2

This course emphasizes essential structural and stylistic elements of composition, especially the formulation of a thesis statement, development of a theme and argument, and relevant use of logic, detail, textual illustration, and persuasive language. Issues of clarity, grammar, and form will be incorporated. This course does not count as an English credit but may be used for elective credit.

Humanities: Social Studies ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-5/