2023-2024 Course Catalog – Humanities: English

◄ Indiana Graduation Pathways

Humanities: English

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required Courses

Every junior must take American Literature the fall semester and World Literature the spring semester.

ENG03101
American Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The American Literature course begins with literature of the New World and ends with contemporary period literature. There is an emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period, depending on the approach of the teacher. Students will have a wide variety of writing assignments, opportunities for oral participation, and other activities connecting literature, history, and culture.

ENG04221
World Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: ENG3101
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course focuses on the study of poetry, drama, and prose produced by authors of various nationalities of the Western and Eastern worlds from the ancient period to the present. Students explore literary movements and intellectual trends with a continuing emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. They also develop essays and projects that call upon the processes of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation and have opportunities for oral participation. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period depending on the approach of the teacher.

Electives: Dramatic Literature

ENG05140
Global Cinema (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

Global Cinema provides students with the opportunity to explore the art of film in a global context. Students will analyze the preoccupations and methodologies of filmmakers and their films from nations like France, Germany, Taiwan, Sweden, India, the Czech Republic, and Mexico. Studying the moving image is akin to studying poetry, and students will be asked to challenge and expand their visual literacy and critical thinking skills. We will study materials in film and art theory, philosophy, and cultural studies, and write thesis-based analytical papers in which we apply theory to film analysis and confront the fictions and non-fictions of worlds beyond our own. In doing so, we will have the chance to see and to understand ourselves better. The course may have guest lecturers from other departments, like language and history, and, when possible, we will screen films in a BSU screening room.

Electives: Themes in Literature:

ENG05101
Women’s Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 cr.
Offered: Fall

Students in this course study literature by and about women beginning with ancient works (Vedic Hymns, Sumerian fertility supplications and songs) and culminating with contemporary novels that explore adolescent and adult women’s struggles for voice and identity within family, community, and history. Through the theme of women’s identity, the course examines different writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in an ongoing investigation and inquiry into the myths and mysteries associated with the experience of being a woman.

ENG05109
Lost Generation Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

Gertrude Stein told Ernest Hemingway, “You are all a lost generation,” labeling the expatriate writers who came to Paris after World War I. Lost Generation Literature focuses on the theme of disenchantment brought about by the meaningless end of the world’s first total war; the resulting materialistic boom and its following national extravagances, corruptions, and decadence; the hypocrisies of prohibition; and the spiritual bankruptcy of the “Jazz Age” or the “Roaring Twenties.” Students examine novels, short stories, and poetry using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry of such twentieth-century literary giants as Stein, Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Pound, Joyce, Eliot, Williams, and e.e. cummings. Women writers of the Left Bank whose works were shadowed by the more popular male writers during the twenties are now anthologized and add a new dimension to this course. As their final exam, students simulate Parisian salons and become the famous writers, artists, musicians, dancers, fashion designers, and publishers who frequented them.

ENG05117
Critical Approaches to Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course on literary criticism provides a survey of advanced theoretical frameworks used to analyze texts. Beginning with the question of ‘what is literature?’, this discussion-driven course explores a variety of modern methods for making meaning. With a thematic emphasis on the literary construction of otherness, students will be introduced to a wide range of critical approaches by applying them to exciting and challenging works, such as Frankenstein, Dracula, The Bluest Eye, and Annihilation. Additionally, students will engage with scholarly articles, develop academic research skills, and construct a literature review to prepare for their own analytical essays.

ENG05145
Tolkien’s Middle Earth and Beyond (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

Take a deep dive into the life and works of one of the best selling authors of all time. Students will study Tolkien’s life and letters to understand how his professional career as a philologist and medievalist influenced and shaped the sub-creation of Middle Earth. In addition to reading his most famous works–The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and the Silmarillion–students will study significant essays and short stories such as Roverandom, Farmer Giles of Ham, Leaf by Niggle, and “On Fairy Stories.” These works allow students to reflect on universal themes of good and evil, death and immortality, and myth and memory. Assignments will include reading and discussion of texts, written analyses, formal presentations, and a creative project.

ENG05147
Ecohorror and Environmental Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

Ecohorror and Environmental Literature is a course that invites students to explore the fascinating overlap between science and culture by taking an interdisciplinary approach to storytelling. In a world beset by increased natural disasters – storms, droughts, wildfires, floods – discussions and debates about the causes and consequences of environmental issues frequently form the basis for adventure and horror. More than just scary stories, such tales reflect how monsters and madness often indicate deep-seeded human anxieties and emotions about important environmental issues. Toxic terrors of pollution, mythic mushrooms, evolutionary evils; there seems to be no limits to the interplay between nature and the human imagination. Looking at these thrills and chills of fictional stories, alongside the non-fiction of science and nature writing, students will discover how human behavior has influenced, and been influenced by, the intricacies of place and nature. In this way, students will address how society can use written communication to prevent humans from being the next endangered species. Coursework will include both discussion and writing, involving a variety of short reflections and creative exercises as well as longer analytical essays.

Electives: Other

ENG05113S1/05113S2
Creative Writing (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Please note: Students may enroll in Writing Fiction or Creative Writing at the Academy, but not both.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

Students in this one semester class write poetry, short stories, plays, and creative non-fiction with opportunities for oral participation. The concept of manipulation of language to convey ideas, feelings, moods, and visual images is the basis of the course. The students become familiar with the standard literary elements through the reading and study of published prose and poetry and are taught to use those elements in their own writing. They learn strategies for evaluating their own writing and the writing of others. Students who are interested in an audience for their creative work and suggestions for improvement and development of their literary styles are encouraged to sign up for this course.

ENG05123/05124
AP English Language and Composition (CL)

Prerequisite: Permission of English Department. In keeping with College Board policy, this course is open to students who are academically prepared for it. Students prepared to benefit from this rigorous course have already shown an excellent work ethic and strong analytic and academic writing ability.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall/Spring Sequence

This year-long course, which prepares students to take the AP English Language and Composition exam, requires students to compose timed, evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays, written in response to College Board prompts, as well as to complete many informal writing exercises. Students will also conduct research, work on grammar and style, and learn to analyze the rhetorical strategies in visual texts and in non-fiction writing from many disciplines and historical periods.

ENG05141S1
Speculative Fiction (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

Speculative Fiction will engage with prevailing questions of society, identity, history and technology through the lens of science fiction, fantasy, horror and other genres. It will explore how literature uses provocative premises to engage in thought experiments and social critique. It will focus on key topics which will be addressed through a sequence of works, emphasizing comparative analysis and a variety of perspectives. Throughout the class we will engage in discussion and debate about the daily readings and their subject matter, produce analytical work about the material, and develop our own speculative topics which reflect the experiences and concerns which are most relevant to us.

Electives: English Quarter Courses

ENG05118
The Short Story (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

The short story is sometimes an under-appreciated art form. Within the space of a few pages, an author must weave a story that is compelling, create characters readers care about and drive the story to its ultimate conclusion. This short story quarter course will include many of the best short story writers of all time, authors who have mastered the art of the short story, turning condensed pieces into memorable works of literature. Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories written in English or famous works that have been translated into English including major authors such as Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Cather, Ellison, Hughes, Hemingway, Faulkner, Anderson, O’Conner, Salinger, Vonnegut, Munro, Mansfield, Erdrich, Alexie, Conrad, Joyce, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Borges, Garcia, Kafka, and many more.

ENG05143
Game Studies & Design (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

As old as history and as new as the latest release, games have played an outsized role in human culture. The advent of digital games has led to an explosion of artistic experimentation and a competitive industry. This course will introduce students to the academic field of game studies, providing an opportunity to think deeply about games and how they function in contemporary culture. It will also encourage students to become active participants in that culture. Students may pursue one of two tracks: a critical track and a design track, with critical students performing scholarly analysis, and design students working to develop a prototype game.

This course is counted as an Academy elective course.

HUM02999
Writing Lab (CP)

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 1 or 2

This course emphasizes essential structural and stylistic elements of composition, especially the formulation of a thesis statement, development of a theme and argument, and relevant use of logic, detail, textual illustration, and persuasive language. Issues of clarity, grammar, and form will be incorporated. This course does not count as an English credit but may be used for elective credit.

Humanities: Social Studies ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-5/