2017-2018 Course Catalog – Humanities: English

◄ Graduation Requirements

Humanities: English

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required Courses

Every junior must take American Literature the fall semester and World Literature the spring semester or take English-Human Struggles their first three semesters. Through the integrated Human Struggles courses students earn both their required English and social studies credits.

ENG04201 – English-Human Struggles III (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Co-requisite: Civitas-Human Struggles III (SOC04201)
Duration: 3 semesters
Credit: 1 cr.
Offered: Fall (Open to class of 2018 only)

Through an examination of political, theological, mythological, and literary expression, students come to understand the background and contexts for contemporary and historical American dilemmas, conflicts, and solutions. The course will approach the American experience from an interdisciplinary and international perspective. Students develop a portfolio of work, which is the basis for their performance assessment in the three-semester sequence.

Students who take this course are signing up for a three-semester course and are required to take all three semesters.

ENG03101 – American Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The American Literature course begins with literature of the New World and ends with contemporary period literature. There is an emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period, depending on the approach of the teacher. Students will have a wide variety of writing assignments, opportunities for oral participation, and other activities connecting literature, history, and culture.

ENG04221 – World Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: ENG3101
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course focuses on the study of poetry, drama, and prose produced by authors of various nationalities of the Western and Eastern worlds from the ancient period to the present. Students explore literary movements and intellectual trends with a continuing emphasis on critical thinking, close reading, and the development of writing skills. They also develop essays and projects that call upon the processes of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation and have opportunities for oral participation. The course is organized by theme, by genre, or by literary and historical period depending on the approach of the teacher.

Electives: Dramatic Literature

ENG05110 – Shakespearean Comedies (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

In this course, students study Shakespeare’s joyous comedies, dark comedies, farces, and romances. Through Shakespeare’s comedies, students explore drama as an oral medium, understand the importance of Shakespeare in the history of drama, and have opportunities to view and portray scenes from the plays being studied. Students engage in creative, analytical, and expository writing throughout the course. Plays such as As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Much Ado About Nothing, Taming of the Shrew, Merchant of Venice, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Measure for Measure, A Winter’s Tale, and The Tempest are among the plays that might be selected for reading.

ENG05112 – Shakespearean Tragedies and Histories (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

In this course, students study a selection of Shakespeare’s tragic and historical plays with attention to plot and character representation as well as to historical contexts and a range of critical theories. Through Shakespeare’s tragedies and histories, students explore drama as an oral medium, come to understand the importance of Shakespeare in the history of drama, and have opportunities to view and portray scenes from the plays being studied. Students engage in creative, analytical, and expository writing throughout the course. There is a rich variety of plays to choose from, including Hamlet, MacBeth, Othello, King Lear, Julius Caesar, King Henry IV, and King Henry V. The instructor can choose from a variety of didactic possibilities, including close reading, videos, creative projects, and class dramatic productions.

ENG05139 – Introduction to Theater and Dramatic Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

Introduction to Theater and Dramatic Literature begins with a study of ancient Greek Theater with particular stress on the nature of tragedy and the principles for tragedy (and drama) proposed by Aristotle in The Poetics. The plays Agamemnon, Antigone, and The Trojan Women represent the three major Greek playwrights. The course continues with Roman Theater, primarily the development of Farce and Senecan tragedy. Everyman is a major work of the Medieval Period, followed by Doctor Faustus as the representative work of the Renaissance. Moliere (French comedy) and English Restoration Comedy are considered. The course then takes a short leap to consider the Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, the Russian playwright Anton Chekov, and two British writers, G.B Shaw and Oscar Wilde. The American triumvirate of Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams are represented, followed by works of Samuel Beckett, Athol Fugard, August Wilson, and David Mamet. In addition to studying the plays as literature, the course includes an emphasis on staging and performance practices of each era and the cultures that helped inspire the plays. Although not an acting or a production course, some acting and some attention to stage design (setting and costumes) are included.

Electives: Themes in Literature:

ENG05101 – Women’s Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 cr.
Offered: Spring

Students in this course study literature by and about women beginning with ancient works (Vedic Hymns, Sumerian fertility supplications and songs) and culminating with contemporary novels that explore adolescent and adult women’s struggles for voice and identity within family, community, and history. Through the theme of women’s identity, the course examines different writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in an ongoing investigation and inquiry into the myths and mysteries associated with the experience of being a woman.

ENG05103 – Literature of the Holocaust (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course offers students the opportunity to investigate a selection of Holocaust literature, including the genres of non-fiction, fiction, poetry, theory and philosophy, and film. Over the course of the semester, we will discuss the question of why the Holocaust should still have relevance to those growing up in the new Millennium, despite the fact that those who witnessed and experienced it have nearly all died. Through an investigation that begins with Hitler’s rise to power, we will analyze the structures of power and subjugation that allowed over six million people to be murdered. We will discuss at length the questions of memory, forgetting, and forgiveness. We will seek to negotiate the very troubling issue of the appropriation of someone else’s experience and motivations for doing so. Group viewings and discussions of films will generate further conversation and ideally lead us to a better understanding of the Holocaust and our individual responsibilities in remembering, forgetting, and passing on the stories of its victims.

ENG05106 – African-American Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course explores the roots of African-American literature and the literary portrayal of the African-American experience in the 19th and 20th Centuries. Through the themes of the African-American struggle for voice, identity and power, the course examines various writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry. Students analyze folktales, slave narratives, poetry, short stories, and novels by such authors as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison. Literary works are contextualized in sociology and politics, and themes of representation and protest are analyzed in the context of broader human, spiritual, and intellectual themes. Attention to visual arts and music may enhance understanding of African-American history and culture.

ENG05109 – Lost Generation Literature (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

Gertrude Stein told Ernest Hemingway, “You are all a lost generation,” labeling the expatriate writers who came to Paris after World War I. Lost Generation Literature focuses on the theme of disenchantment brought about by the meaningless end of the world’s first total war; the resulting materialistic boom and its following national extravagances, corruptions, and decadence; the hypocrisies of prohibition; and the spiritual bankruptcy of the “Jazz Age” or the “Roaring Twenties.” Students examine novels, short stories, and poetry using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry of such twentieth-century literary giants as Stein, Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Pound, Joyce, Eliot, Williams, and e.e. cummings. Women writers of the Left Bank whose works were shadowed by the more popular male writers during the twenties are now anthologized and add a new dimension to this course. As their final exam, students simulate Parisian salons and become the famous writers, artists, musicians, dancers, fashion designers, and publishers who frequented them.

ENG05117 – Critical Approaches to Literature, Freudian and Jungian (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This literary criticism course uses Freudian and Jungian psychology to analyze literature that focuses on the theme of the dual personality. Students delve into what is often labeled as true self vs. the false self, the concept of the “double,” ego vs. alter ego or mirroring personalities, and id, ego, and super-ego. Through psychological and archetypal analysis, the course examines different writers and genres using written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking to engage in ongoing investigation and inquiry. The theories of Freud and Jung are employed to analyze such literary works as Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Frankenstein, Winesburg, Ohio, A Doll’s House, The Metamorphosis, Lord of the Flies, Heart of Darkness, Faust, The Picture of Dorian Grey, Demian, and Beloved. Students investigate psychological motives, unconscious desires and anxieties, myths and dreams as symbolic projections of people’s hopes, fears, and aspirations as they analyze the underlying human behavior of classical literary characters.

ENG05133 – Poetry (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

In this course, students read and analyze poems written in English from the seventh through the twenty-first centuries, organized around such themes as family, nature, love, death, religious experience, and the imagination. Through discussion, formal and informal writing assignments, oral presentations, and a major project, students should develop as analytic and imaginative thinkers and writers while they learn to read poetry with greater understanding and pleasure. Traditional poetic themes are used with written composition, oral participation, and critical thinking for investigation and inquiry.

ENG05134 – The Victorian Novel (CL)

Prerequisite: Completion of American Literature (ENG03101)
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The Victorian Novel is an elective for students who wish to study the development of the novel and the evolution of literary thought in Great Britain from (approximately) 1830-1901. Students will read, among other works, influential novels by Emily and Charlotte Bronte, Thomas Hardy, Charles Dickens, and William Thackeray. Additional texts will include handbooks for understanding the context of the Victorian novel, and for writing papers on long-form works of literature. Class will consist of written and oral participation, research and creative projects, and formal and informal essays.

Electives: Other

ENG05113S1/05113S2 – Creative Writing (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Note: Students may enroll in Writing Fiction or Creative Writing at the Academy, but not both.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

Students in this one semester class write poetry, short stories, plays, and creative non-fiction with opportunities for oral participation. The concept of manipulation of language to convey ideas, feelings, moods, and visual images is the basis of the course. The students become familiar with the standard literary elements through the reading and study of published prose and poetry and are taught to use those elements in their own writing. They learn strategies for evaluating their own writing and the writing of others. Students who are interested in an audience for their creative work and suggestions for improvement and development of their literary styles are encouraged to sign up for this course.

ENG05123/05124 – AP English Language and Composition (CL)

Prerequisite: Permission of English Department. In keeping with College Board policy, this course is open to students who are academically prepared for it. Students prepared to benefit from this rigorous course have already shown an excellent work ethic and strong analytic and academic writing ability.
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall/Spring Sequence

This year-long course, which prepares students to take the AP English Language and Composition exam, requires students to compose timed, evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays, written in response to College Board prompts, as well as to complete many informal writing exercises. Students will also conduct research, work on grammar and style, and learn to analyze the rhetorical strategies in visual texts and in non-fiction writing from many disciplines and historical periods.

ENG05130 – Great Literary Works: A Guided Independent Reading Course (CL)

Prerequisite: Completion of American Literature (ENG03101) and World Literature (ENG04220), or English-Human Struggles 1, 2 (ENG03201/ENG03202), and Instructor Permission
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This fall guided reading course is designed for students who love to read independently. These readers are given an opportunity to select their own literary works, create their own syllabus, and discuss their works individually with the teacher. The course is also directed at students who would like to further their study of classical works. Students choose their syllabus readings from various college-bound literary reading lists compiled by the English Department. The teacher meets with the class as a group for four sessions to introduce the reading lists, guide students in the discussion process, and give directives for the required literary journal that is the writing component in the course. Students meet individually with the teacher from that point on for their conferences. The grade for this course is based primarily on the conference discussions and the journals.

Electives: English Quarter Courses

ENG05107 – Historical/Literature Themes (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

Students will read Hemingway’s short stories that focus on a coming-of-age Nick Adams as he explores the fields, streams, and woods in northern Michigan and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula; develops both relationships and conflicts with the Native American Odawa tribe in that area; ultimately becomes a soldier in WWI, and returns from that war psychologically troubled. Students will also read Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls, his famous war novel set during the Spanish civil war. Considered one of the greatest war novels of all time, this masterpiece is seldom taught in a regular American Literature class because of its length.

ENG05118 – The Short Story (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

The short story is sometimes an under-appreciated art form. Within the space of a few pages, an author must weave a story that is compelling, create characters readers care about and drive the story to its ultimate conclusion. This short story quarter course will include many of the best short story writers of all time, authors who have mastered the art of the short story, turning condensed pieces into memorable works of literature. Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories written in English or famous works that have been translated into English including major authors such as Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Cather, Ellison, Hughes, Hemingway, Faulkner, Anderson, O’Conner, Salinger, Vonnegut, Munro, Mansfield, Erdrich, Alexie, Conrad, Joyce, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Borges, Garcia, Kafka, and many more.

ENG05119 – John Steinbeck (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

The course is an examination of John Steinbeck—the man himself; his place, primarily Monterey and Salinas, California; his influences, including ED Ricketts and Joseph Campbell; and his writing techniques, his style, and his themes. The course begins with a study of a series of his short stories, and continues with the study of two of his short novels, Of Mice And Men and Cannery Row. The second half of the course will consider his major novel, The Grapes Of Wrath.

ENG05120 – Writing Fiction (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Note: Students may enroll in Writing Fiction or Creative Writing at the Academy, but not both.
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

Writing Fiction is a quarter course that provides aspiring fiction writers with rigorous practice in writing fiction within a variety of contexts and genres. Students will read and write short fiction and discover strategies for producing evocative descriptions, exciting dialogue, engrossing characters, and stories worth telling. Students will write and revise their own work and discuss the work of their peers in and out of the classroom. Writing Fiction requires consistent writing, both in and out of class, and students who take the course can expect to have produced a sizeable quantity of creative fiction by the end of the quarter.

ENG05135 – Academic Writing: Exposition (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

Academic Writing: Exposition is designed for students who wish to concentrate on writing successful expository papers. The class stresses finding topics, organizational patterns, and developing a thesis with strong supporting materials. The major work of the course consists of four papers. The papers include: a personal narrative, an essay developed primarily by description, a paper developed by using examples, and a paper following the classification pattern of organization. Part of class time is used as workshop for instructor review of papers, peer editing, grammar review, sentence and paragraph construction, and working to eliminate common writing errors.

ENG05136 – Academic Writing: Argumentation (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

Argumentation is a quarter course that offers students rigorous practice in writing argumentative academic papers. Students will learn classical and modern rhetorical strategies for persuading audiences through especially thoughtful written arguments. Students will write and revise a number of argumentative papers throughout the course, and will also read and analyze effective argumentative pieces written by their peers and scholars.

This course is counted as an Academy elective course.

HUM02999 – Writing Lab (CP)

Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 1 or 2

This course emphasizes essential structural and stylistic elements of composition, especially the formulation of a thesis statement, development of a theme and argument, and relevant use of logic, detail, textual illustration, and persuasive language. Issues of clarity, grammar, and form will be incorporated. This course does not count as an English credit but may be used for elective credit.

Humanities: Social Studies ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-5/