2018-2019 Course Catalog – Humanities: Social Studies

◄ Humanities: English

Humanities: Social Studies

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required Courses

All students must successfully complete Foundations of the American Experience, American History 1, American History 2, and one social studies elective to meet the social studies requirements.

SOC200
Foundations of the American Experience (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course explores political and economic theory and practice from the ancient Mediterranean world into the twentieth century to prepare students for American History 1 and 2. Students will build their knowledge of key historical concepts and events, as well as their analytical abilities, to enhance their understanding of the politics and economics of the present.

SOC201
American History 1 (DC)

Prerequisite: Foundations of American Experience
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course is a survey of American historical, intellectual, literary, cultural, mythic, economic, diplomatic, theological and political experiences which builds upon concepts developed in Foundations of American Experience. Students will examine key events, ideas, personalities and movements from European exploration to the end of Reconstruction as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 201 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC202
American History 2 (DC)

Prerequisite: American History 1
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall or Spring

This survey course builds upon concepts developed in Foundations of the American Experience and of American History 1, and emphasizes national development from the late nineteenth century into the twenty-first century. Fundamental themes of a diplomatic, economic, political, intellectual, cultural, and social nature will be explored through the study of key events, personalities, groups, and movements as they relate to life in Indiana and the United States.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 202 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

Electives: Topics in History

SOC05101
Indiana History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will examine the history of Indiana through the present day. Major personalities and important events in the political, economic, literary, philosophical, intellectual, educational, and social realms will be explored. Hoosier hospitality will be the norm for discussion—even when asking the age-old question: what exactly is a “hoosier?”

SOC05107Q1
Historical and Literary Themes: Colonial America, 1492-1763 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 1

This course examines the major developments of North American settlement from European contact to 1763. Topics may include political, economic, social, religious, and military themes and address how settlement impacted race, ethnicity, and gender.

SOC05107Q2
Historical and Literary Themes: Revolutionary America, 1763-1800 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 2

This course examines the disintegration of colonial ties, American independence, and the creation, implementation, and experiment of republican government in the late-eighteenth century. Specific themes may include the political, economic, social, religious, and military developments that led to independence and shaped the early United States.

SOC05107Q3
Historical and Literary Themes: U.S. Since 1945 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

This intensive reading course examines the major developments in US history since World War II. Topics may include the Cold War, cultural and political movements of the 50s through 80s, Vietnam, the return of conservatism, globalization, life in the new information age, and race and ethnicity.

SOC05107Q4
Historical and Literary Themes: U.S. Women’s History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

This intensive reading course examines the major developments in American Women’s History. Topics may include economic roles, marriage and family relations, political changes, the feminine “ideal,” and activism. Special focus will be made on the intersection of race, ethnicity, and class with gender.

SOC05130
The West in the World (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

The West in the World is a survey of the development of Western Civilization since its origins emphasizing key problems, turning points, and recurring themes, especially in the past two centuries. The course emphasizes the civilization that emerged and developed in Europe and spread to the Americas during the past two millennia. The West in the World also focuses on the way peoples around the globe helped to shape Western Civilization and how they felt its influence. Non-Western civilizations have exercised a powerful influence on Western Civilization, and the West has interacted with the rest of the world throughout its history.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours to students in HIST 150 upon completion of this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC05140
History of World Religions (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the development of religions around the world from prehistoric to modern times. The major world religions will be studied, along with religions of the ancient world and of non-literate peoples. Primary sources will be emphasized to understand the key components of various religions. Special emphasis will also be placed on early developments, exploring the interaction between different religions, as well as the relation of religions to the historical time periods through which they develop.

SOC05143
Readings in American Working-Class History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 1

This is an intensive reading course that will explore major issues and historiographical trends in American working-class history. Using selected primary and secondary sources, students will gain a working knowledge of American working-class history. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the institution of slavery as a labor system, the early attempts at solidarity, the rise of corporate capitalism, the emergence of labor organizations during the industrial period, the ideologies of the working class, and the impact of downsizing on workers. Specific attention will be given to the roles of gender, race, ethnicity, and technological changes in defining the experiences of the working class.

SOC05145
Readings in the History of Science and Technology (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 3

This is an intensive reading course that will explore major issues and historiographical trends in the History of Science and Technology. Using primary and secondary sources, students will gain a working knowledge of important issues in the history of science and technology. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the philosophy of science, the evolution of scientific thought from Ancient Greece to the modern period, the development of different technologies, and the evolution of medicine.

SOC05146
Readings in Appalachian Regional History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 4

This is an intensive reading course that will explore major issues and historiographical trends in Appalachian Regional History. Using selected primary and secondary sources, students will gain a working knowledge of Appalachian Regional History. The course will examine Appalachia’s three phases of development: traditional society in the 19th century, the industrialization of the region in the early 20th century, and the problems facing contemporary Appalachia, with a specific focus on migration from the region to Indiana and other Midwestern states after World War II.

SOC05148
The American Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1850-1877 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

The American Civil War represents the seminal event in the nation’s history, and the period of Reconstruction that followed it profoundly shaped the war’s impact and legacy. This course will give students a firm grasp of the events, people, and issues that led the nation to war. It will address how the war unfolded, explore the positive changes experienced by freedmen during the initial stages of Reconstruction, and discuss how and why the nation eventually reunified at the expense of African-American political and civil rights. The course will cover military, political, social, and economic factors in the causes of the war and Reconstruction. As students explore the topic of the American Civil War era, they will develop historical research skills using both primary and secondary sources.

SOC05149
Readings in American History, 1920-1945 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: .5 credit
Offered: Quarter 2

This is an intensive reading course that explores American national history from 1920 to 1945. Particular attention may be given to national political, economic, social, and cultural development during the 1920s, the Great Depression and New Deal, and the American home front in the first half of the 1940s.

SOC05150
Themes in Ethnic Studies (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the historical development, lifestyles, and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States and the world. Course themes may include a focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or may use a comparative approach to study the cultural development, political trends, and economic impact of various ethnic or cultural groups, as well as issues of immigration and assimilation. Literary works emanating from the various ethnic groups may also be subject to scrutiny and discussion.

Electives: Topics in Social Science

SOC05123
The Living Constitution and the American Legal System (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The Constitution of the United States is viewed as a living document as current events, politics, and major issues facing the United States form one focus for this course. The second area of focus will be law: criminal law, Constitutional law, and due process. As students explore the Constitution and the American legal system, they will utilize methods of inquiry and develop research and thinking skills. This course will be of great interest to students with career aspirations in political science or law.

SOC05142
History Through Art and Architecture (CL)

Prerequisite: Not open to students with credit in Social History of Art
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

An introduction to the meanings and purposes of art and architecture in human society. Subjects covered would include non-Western and pre-Modern cultures. Potential themes would include art and architecture as media of communication, tools of power, and expressions of identity. Specific topics might include: anthropological perspectives on “primitive” art; the human form in ancient Greece and Rome, connected to and compared with the human form in South Asia; Western “history painting” from the Alexander mosaic to Picasso’s Guernica; the human image and iconoclasm in medieval Western, Byzantine, and Islamic art; landscape painting and the invention of the environmentalist ethic; sacrifice, self-sacrifice and political prestige in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica; art as a luxury good in modern capitalist societies; “agitprop” and advertising in the twentieth century.

Humanities: World Languages ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-6/