2020-2021 Course Catalog – Humanities: Social Studies

◄ Humanities: English

Humanities: Social Studies

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required American History Courses

All students must successfully complete American History, 1492-1876 and American History, 1877-Present. Normally taken junior year.

SOC203
American History, 1492-1876 (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course surveys the American historical experience through 1876. Students will examine key events, ideas, personalities and movements from before European exploration to the end of Reconstruction.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 201 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC204
American History, 1877-Present (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course surveys the American historical experience since 1877. Students will examine key events, ideas, personalities and movements since the end of Reconstruction.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 202 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

Required Government Course

All students must successfully complete ONE government course from the options listed below. Normally taken fall of senior year.

SOC301
Exploring United States Government: Political Theory and Practice (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

An exploration of United States government, with particular reference to past and present political theory. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of thinkers and ideas, as both the sources of American law and government and as comparative examples. Connections will be made between theory and practice, and students will be encouraged to think creatively about the nature, history, and present course of American government and politics. Critical thinking and productive civil discourse will be consistently emphasized. (Only one credit can be earned from the Exploring United States Government course series.)

SOC302
Exploring United States Government: Search for Democracy (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

An exploration of United States government, with particular reference to the history and experience of creating and sustaining a democratic system and way of life for all. What is a democracy, and what does it mean to live in a democratic country? Topics may include diversity, equality, equity, political power, and similar pressing questions of past and present. Critical thinking and productive civil discourse will be consistently emphasized. (Only one credit can be earned from the Exploring United States Government course series.)

SOC303
Exploring United States Government: The Constitution (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

An exploration of United States government, with particular attention to the history and role of the Constitution. The Constitution of the United States is not only the law of the land, it is also the fundamental political mechanism under which the nation has achieved unprecedented freedom and prosperity. This course will provide students with both a historical background and a modern working knowledge of the Constitution and the American political system. Discussions will regularly consider how the Constitution applies to current issues. Critical thinking and productive civil discourse will also be consistently emphasized. (Only one credit can be earned from the Exploring United States Government course series.)

Required Economics Course

All students must successfully complete ONE economics course from the options listed below. Normally taken spring of senior year.

ECON116
Survey of Economics (CL)

Prerequisite: Senior only except with permission of Social Studies Department Head
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

An introduction to important and influential economic theories and circumstances, with specific examples chosen by the instructor. Course topics will include the study of scarcity and economic reasoning, supply and demand, market structures, the role of government, national economic performance, the role of financial institutions, economic stabilization, and trade.

ECON201
Elementary Microeconomics (CL)

Prerequisite: Senior only except with permission of Social Studies Department Head
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

A study of why people specialize as producers and exchange what they produce with others. Includes analysis of how market structure affects prices. Discusses the issue of whether self-interested economic behavior promotes or hinders society. Recommended for students interested in pursuing economics, business or related studies in college.

Electives: Topics in History

SOC05101
Indiana History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course will examine the history of Indiana through the present day. Major personalities and important events in the political, economic, literary, philosophical, intellectual, educational, and social realms will be explored. Hoosier hospitality will be the norm for discussion—even when asking the age-old question: what exactly is a “hoosier?”

SOC05105
The History and Philosophy of Medicine I: From “The Ancient” to “The Medieval” (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course investigates the history of medicine in the ancient and medieval periods through a multidisciplinary lens. We will spend some time on non-European medical traditions (Egypt, Mesopotamia, and China) but will concentrate on medicine as formulated in the Greco-Roman world, as it is upon this tradition that modern medicine is founded – and frequently invokes (e.g. the Hippocratic oath). The goals of the course are two-fold: first, to help us understand our own practices and discourses concerning health in a radical way and, second, to gain an understanding of alternative models of health and healing, of which the Greco-Roman tradition is one part. We will meander through Egyptian papyri and discover ancient remedies and cures; we will investigate the various ‘schools’ of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean and how their differences and disagreements were based in underlying debates about the nature of knowing; we will read first-hand accounts from a variety of time periods; and we will trace the influence and history of medical ideas through ancient Europe and into medieval Europe and the Islamic world.

SOC05130
The West in the World (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

The West in the World is a survey of the development of Western Civilization since its origins emphasizing key problems, turning points, and recurring themes, especially in the past two centuries. The course emphasizes the civilization that emerged and developed in Europe and spread to the Americas during the past two millennia. The West in the World also focuses on the way peoples around the globe helped to shape Western Civilization and how they felt its influence. Non-Western civilizations have exercised a powerful influence on Western Civilization, and the West has interacted with the rest of the world throughout its history.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours to students in HIST 150 upon completion of this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC05137
Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1945 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course explores the American national history from 1920 to 1945. Particular attention is given to national political, economic, social, and cultural development; the 1920s; the Great Depression and New Deal; and the American home front of the first half of the 1940s.

SOC05138
Workers in America (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the major issues and historical transformations of the American working class. Particular focus will fall on the institution of slavery as a labor system, the early attempts at solidarity, the rise of corporate capitalism, the emergence of labor organizations during the industrial period, the ideologies of the working class, and the impact of downsizing on workers. Specific attention will be given to the roles of gender, race, ethnicity, and technological changes in defining the experiences of the working class.

SOC05140
History of World Religions (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the development of religions around the world from prehistoric to modern times. The major world religions will be studied, along with religions of the ancient world and of non-literate peoples. Primary sources will be emphasized to understand the key components of various religions. Special emphasis will also be placed on early developments, exploring the interaction between different religions, as well as the relation of religions to the historical time periods through which they develop.

SOC05148
The American Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1850-1877 (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The American Civil War represents the seminal event in the nation’s history, and the period of Reconstruction that followed it profoundly shaped the war’s impact and legacy. This course will give students a firm grasp of the events, people, and issues that led the nation to war. It will address how the war unfolded, explore the positive changes experienced by freedmen during the initial stages of Reconstruction, and discuss how and why the nation eventually reunified at the expense of African-American political and civil rights. The course will cover military, political, social, and economic factors in the causes of the war and Reconstruction. As students explore the topic of the American Civil War era, they will develop historical research skills using both primary and secondary sources.

SOC05150
Themes in Ethnic Studies (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course will explore the historical development, lifestyles, and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States and the world. Course themes may include a focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or may use a comparative approach to study the cultural development, political trends, and economic impact of various ethnic or cultural groups, as well as issues of immigration and assimilation. Literary works emanating from the various ethnic groups may also be subject to scrutiny and discussion.

Humanities: World Languages ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-6/