2019-2020 Course Catalog – Humanities: Social Studies

◄ Humanities: English

Humanities: Social Studies

CL College Level

CP College Prep

DC Dual Credit

XC Exploratory Course

Required Courses

All students must successfully complete American History, 1492-1876; American History, 1877-Present; and one Government course (either Foundations of the American Experience or one of the Exploring American Government courses).

SOC203
American History, 1492-1876 (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course surveys the American historical experience through 1876. Students will examine key events, ideas, personalities and movements from before European exploration to the end of Reconstruction.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 201 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC204
American History, 1877-Present (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall (seniors) / Spring (juniors)

This course surveys the American historical experience since 1877. Students will examine key events, ideas, personalities and movements since the end of Reconstruction.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours in HIST 202 to students who complete this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

Electives: Topics in History

SOC05101
Indiana History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will examine the history of Indiana through the present day. Major personalities and important events in the political, economic, literary, philosophical, intellectual, educational, and social realms will be explored. Hoosier hospitality will be the norm for discussion—even when asking the age-old question: what exactly is a “hoosier?”

SOC05103
Humans and Other Animals: A New Global History from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

Animals riddle the pages of human history, yet most historians have made these animals invisible, relegating them to the margins. In actuality, though, animals have not only made human history itself possible, but they have appeared as important and central figures in every chapter of this history. The standard narratives of civilizations, societies, and nations are built upon the backs of animals, large and small. In many chapters of these tales, animals indeed may even prove more important than humans. This class attempts to push through and past a human-centered (anthropocentric) historical tradition to uncover a livelier, and more truthful, and complex past fashioned and experienced by all of the planet’s animals-human and otherwise.

SOC05105
The History and Philosophy of Medicine I: From “The Ancient” to “The Medieval” (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

This course investigates the history of medicine in the ancient and medieval periods through a multidisciplinary lens. We will spend some time on non-European medical traditions (Egypt, Mesopotamia, and China) but will concentrate on medicine as formulated in the Greco-Roman world, as it is upon this tradition that modern medicine is founded – and frequently invokes (e.g. the Hippocratic oath). The goals of the course are two-fold: first, to help us understand our own practices and discourses concerning health in a radical way and, second, to gain an understanding of alternative models of health and healing, of which the Greco-Roman tradition is one part. We will meander through Egyptian papyri and discover ancient remedies and cures; we will investigate the various ‘schools’ of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean and how their differences and disagreements were based in underlying debates about the nature of knowing; we will read first-hand accounts from a variety of time periods; and we will trace the influence and history of medical ideas through ancient Europe and into medieval Europe and the Islamic world.

SOC05106
The History and Philosophy of Medicine II: From “The Renaissance” to “Modernity” (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

his class examines the vicissitudes of the history of medicine between the Renaissance and the end of the bacteriological revolution of the late-nineteenth and the early-twentieth century. Transnational in scope, the class will traverse across Mediterranean, Near Eastern, European, and American medical thought while, at the same time, interrogating African and indigenous modes of understanding, especially as they shape Western medicine in the age of empire. This course asks students to search for both healing and violence in the history of medicine. This course will examine topics like: understandings of our bodies (for example, our circulatory system), infectious diseases and epidemics, non-communicable diseases, mental illnesses, therapeutics, institutions like hospitals and asylums, technologies and diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, surgical practices, medical education, medical subjects, and public health. It will look at the history of these and will simultaneously critique these histories within the frameworks of social constructivism, postcolonialism, science studies, and feminism. Ultimately, this course will show how the history of medicine, from the Renaissance to the present, still lays embedded in the medical thought that we call “modern.”

SOC05130
The West in the World (DC)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

The West in the World is a survey of the development of Western Civilization since its origins emphasizing key problems, turning points, and recurring themes, especially in the past two centuries. The course emphasizes the civilization that emerged and developed in Europe and spread to the Americas during the past two millennia. The West in the World also focuses on the way peoples around the globe helped to shape Western Civilization and how they felt its influence. Non-Western civilizations have exercised a powerful influence on Western Civilization, and the West has interacted with the rest of the world throughout its history.

* Ball State University offers 3 college credit hours to students in HIST 150 upon completion of this course. Refer to the Dual Credit section for details on enrollment and fees.

SOC05140
History of World Religions (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the development of religions around the world from prehistoric to modern times. The major world religions will be studied, along with religions of the ancient world and of non-literate peoples. Primary sources will be emphasized to understand the key components of various religions. Special emphasis will also be placed on early developments, exploring the interaction between different religions, as well as the relation of religions to the historical time periods through which they develop.

SOC05141
Appalachian Regional History (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course is a survey of the history of Appalachia, with particular focus on Southern and Central Appalachia. The course focuses on Appalachia’s three phases of development: traditional society in the 19th century, the industrialization of the region in the early 20th century, and the problems facing contemporary Appalachia, with a specific focus on migration from the region to Indiana and the Midwest after World War II.

SOC05147
The Life and Times of Abraham Lincoln (CL)

Prerequisite: SOC201
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course examines the life of Abraham Lincoln primarily through the lens of his own writings. Students will see how ambition and personal tragedies of his youth impacted his life and mature beliefs; how the tenets of the Whig party shaped his career in Illinois state politics and as a one-term U.S. congressman; how an autodidact established a successful law career; how a commitment to antislavery principles brought national prominence during the sectional crisis and facilitated his rise to the presidency as a Republican; and how a president committed to the preservation of the Union ended up waging a war against American slavery.

SOC05150
Themes in Ethnic Studies (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Spring

This course will explore the historical development, lifestyles, and cultural patterns of ethnic groups in the United States and the world. Course themes may include a focus on a particular ethnic group or groups, or may use a comparative approach to study the cultural development, political trends, and economic impact of various ethnic or cultural groups, as well as issues of immigration and assimilation. Literary works emanating from the various ethnic groups may also be subject to scrutiny and discussion.

Electives: Topics in Social Science

SOC05122
Exploring American Government: U.S. Constitution (CL)

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 1 credit
Offered: Fall

The Constitution of the United States is not only the law of the land, it is the fundamental political mechanism under which the nation has achieved unprecedented freedom and prosperity. This course will provide students with both a historical background and a modern working knowledge of the Constitution and the American political system. Discussion of the applications of the Constitution to current issues will be a regular theme. Critical thinking and productive civil discourse will also be consistently emphasized. This is a very interactive course with the students engaged in simulations, discussion, role-play and research.

Humanities: World Languages ►

https://academy.bsu.edu/catalog/catalog-6/