May Term 2018 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course, to travel, or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience each academic year. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 16, 2018 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. No one is allowed to drop or add a May Term course. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 16, 2018. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship or those who have paid deposits for trips (for example: Australia, North Carolina Appalachia, or Yellowstone).
  3. All students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 16, 2018, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  4. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course, May Term trip, or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational travel not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Sheet.

Course Descriptions

MT000001 • Habitat for Humanity—Holistic Rehabilitation in Greater Muncie
Learn some construction skills and help others at the same time—work for Habitat for Humanity. Greater Muncie Indiana Habitat for Humanity, Inc. is a non-profit organization founded on the beliefs that every person should have a decent, safe and affordable place to live. Habitat works with volunteers from all walks of life to build decent, affordable housing in partnership with families who will live in them. In addition, Habitat staff and volunteers work on rehabilitating existing homes and helping with home maintenance. Most of each day will be filled with physical labor. For example, we may be painting homes, pressure washing homes, landscaping, maintaining yards, building decks or ramps, building walkways (In 2016, we built a walkway with a guide wire so a blind woman could go to her mailbox on her own), or general cleanup. Students must be at least 16 years of age. Consent and insurance information from parents is required. Each student must take his or her own lunch. Students must keep a daily journal and submit it for evaluation. Hours worked in excess of 60 can be used for Community Service. This is a hands-on course. Students will be exposed to the process of volunteering for a community organization and should feel more comfortable in doing so later in their lives.
Prerequisite:Students must be over 16 years of age, and are required to wear shoes/boots that provide sturdy protection for their feet and clothing they don’t mind getting filthy or splattered with paint.
Meeting Time:8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40.00 per student for transportation
Instructor:Mr. Christopher Reid & Ms. Susie Cunningham
Preferred Classroom:On-site location
MT000081 • Creative Writing
This is a workshop in imaginative writing, with practice in short fiction, poetry, and drama. You will try your hand at a variety of exercises, write inside and outside of class, allow your classmates and teacher to read your writing, and read some of your writing aloud. You will also read and analyze published examples of writing. To complete the 60 hours required for a May Term class, you’ll spend four hours class and two hours on homework. The teacher’s primary job will be not to judge your writing, but to provide a variety of ways to practice the art and craft and pleasure of creative writing. Writers of all levels, including beginners, are welcome. NOTE: Priority goes to students who have not taken any Academy creative writing class: the semester-long Creative Writing or a quarter class in Writing Fiction or Writing Poetry.

Students should learn a variety of techniques for generating imaginative writing and develop their skill in analyzing and appreciating creative writing. During class, students will discuss, engage in a variety of exercises, and read aloud from their written work. Outside class, the student will write, visit the art museum, and work together to compose, practice and perform an original play.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Margaret Smith
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000107 • The Chronicles of Narnia
The release of the three major motion pictures over the last decade renewed interest in The Chronicles of Narnia, but this series of books by C. S. Lewis has fascinated readers of all ages for several decades. The seven books in the series will provide much room for class discussion and outside research. Some dispute exists among scholars as to whether the Narnia world was intended by Lewis to be an allegory. This course will delve beyond the stories to discuss the story behind the stories and the man behind the stories.

By participating in this course, students will become familiar with C. S. Lewis, a prominent 20th century novelist, academic, and philosopher. Students will analyze important themes represented in the literature of Lewis. Course work will include discussions of each book in the series, student presentations, and viewing of the movies from the series. Outside work will include reading, researching relevant topics, preparing in-class presentations, and writing short papers.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000131 • Game Theory and Strategy
While most of high school geometry was known two thousand years ago, and calculus was discovered in the 17th century, the development of the mathematics of game theory has taken place only with the past 80 years. Game theory is an interdisciplinary subject, which models decision-making strategies in fields such as anthropology, social psychology, economics, business, politics, philosophy and biology. Games include two-person zero-sum games, in which one player’s gains are the other player’s losses, non-zero-sum games, and n-person games, which may incorporate bargaining and coalitions. Particular applications include the classical “prisoner’s dilemma,” parliamentary coalitions, weighted voting (as in the U.S. Electoral College), and Newcomb’s Problem and free will.
Prerequisite:Pre-calculus for AP 2 or equivalent, and an interest in mathematics
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$51.00 for textbook
Instructor:Mr. John Rajca
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000168 • Math & Problem Solving in Popular Strategy Games
This May Term experience will explore the mathematics and problem-solving strategies that are incorporated in the playing, and hopefully winning of board games. A variety of problem-solving strategies in addition to mathematical concepts will be studied and applied in the board games chosen for this two-week adventure. Included among these are optimization strategies, cooperative game strategies, risk vs. reward strategies, deductive reasoning, spatial orientation, and graph theory.

We will meet as a group 3 hours a day; you will independently meet 3 hours per day and keep a log of the time spent playing the games. Each individual will be required to submit a two-page report on one of their favorite games played during the week. In this report, you should include a brief description of the game itself, why you liked playing the game, and explanation of the math and/or problem-solving strategies you and/or others used to try to win the game, and which strategies seemed to be successful and which ones were not.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 to purchase games
Instructor:Mr. Joshua Ruark
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • Great Contemporary Film Directors
This course introduces students to several of the great film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Wes Anderson, Hong-jin Na, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. But what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:2:00 p.m.–3:30 p.m. & 5:45 p.m.–8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000194 • Technology in the Movies
40 years of Star Wars — This class will look at how technology is used in the movies and how it has changed over the years in Star Wars. We will start out where I started back in 1977 with the release of the film Star Wars. The successful sequels of The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Return of the Jedi (1983) followed it. Next the Prequel trilogy will be shown with The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones, and then Revenge of the Sith. Finally, The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi and Rogue One will finish out the movie selection. There will be some shorts in here of how things were created for the movies.

The class will be watching one movie each day and then discussion about what we saw technology-wise in each movie. Each student will also write a 3- to 5-page paper over a topic I assign in class each day.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40.00 for movies & food
Instructor:Mr. Jon Grady
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000203 • Geometrical Optics
Geometrical optics is the study of light based on the Laws governing the phenomenon of Reflection and Refraction. The course will include image formations by plane mirror, spherical mirrors, thin lenses, and combinations of mirrors and lenses; Lens Maker’s Equation and power of lenses; and dispersion of light by a prism. Lab and hands-on activities will be an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Hasan Fakhruddin
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000207 • Integrating Forensic Psychology & Historical Crimes
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the forensic tools used to identify serial offenders and analyze patterns that may predict future offenses and/or victims involved in violent crimes. Students will learn about some of the leading psychological theories on sociopathy and psychopathy and how that factors into constructing offender profiles. This course will take a historical, literary, and cinematographic approach to reviewing front-page crimes over the last 150 years. This will be accomplished by reading A Devil in the White City, an award-winning historical novel relaying the crimes of H. H. Holmes at the time of the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago; examining how Holmes was developed into a fictional character of Sweeney Todd; using historical resources about the crimes and psychopathy of Ed Gein; examining how Gein’s crimes were the impetus for the famed Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho masterpiece; and using episodes of “Most Evil” in which noted forensic psychiatrist, Michael Stone, elucidates his method of categorizing criminals involved in violent crimes. The book Serial Killers: The Method and Madness of Monsters will serve as a reference text for students in this course. This course will climax in an overnight trip to Chicago where students will participate in two historical tours: “Devil in the White City Tour” and Chicago’s “True Crime and Mystery Tour.” Students will be assessed through a written analysis and oral PowerPoint presentation where groups will be required to develop a sound criminal profile in regards to a historical serial killer and examine how law enforcement forensically solved the crimes and identified the violent offender.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:30 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$350 for field trip expenses & textbooks
Instructor:Mr. Les McSparrin
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000211 • Yellowstone National Park
Students will learn about one of America’s greatest treasures: Yellowstone. They will explore the park daily and learn about its many unique features, history, flora and fauna. As a group we will enter the park every day and we will travel throughout the park as we study different aspects of the park. Students will do research before the trip on topics related to history, science or tourism. They will present their projects in the park while visiting the area that applies to their project. In addition to travelling throughout the park, students will also plan a short hike that we will take in each area of the park. They will research different hikes and present them to the group with relevant features.

Students will be graded on his/her participation in the entire experience as well as individual projects assigned and graded by chaperones. These projects will be the student’s choice (with teacher guidance) and will involve research regarding one of the features of the park, the history of the park, various NPS policies regarding wildlife and fire suppression. Students will also plan a hike and provide details about the attractions on said hike.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember—a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 12, 2018 – May 25, 2018
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$1,700 for travel expenses
Instructor:Mr. Robert Smith & Ms. Kathryn Marsh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship
Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials.
Prerequisite:A Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations
MT000215 • Australia Trip
Hiking and History in New South Wales, Australia. A ten-day adventure travel experience to Sydney and the surrounding region, including the Blue Mountains. Participants will be exposed to the history of Australia, particularly the early days of convict settlement, as well as the distinctive natural landscape, fauna, and flora of the “Great Southern Continent.” Expected highlights will include a whale-watching trip, early convict settlement-era barracks and homesteads, and hiking days in the Blue Mountains National Park, Royal National Park, and Ku Ring Gai National Park. Be aware that this description is for informational purposes only. Student participants were all chosen in the fall of 2017; no opening places on the trip are expected now, in the spring of 2018.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember—a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 12, 2018–May 25, 2018
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$3,400 for travel expenses
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold & Dr. Diane Kallmeyer
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000216 • Japanese Culture Through Film / Make Your Own Manga
Do you love anime/manga, love to draw? Is Japanese culture fascinating to you? This brief May Term will introduce you to some significant anime/Japanese films, as well as work on your manga. The first week, we will watch films that show important aspects of Japanese cultures. Suggested films are Studio Ghibli films, Makoto Shinkai and Kurosawa films. We will also do some Japanese cultural activities. Ideas for activities include go, Hanafuda games, and calligraphy. The second week, students will make their own 8-page black/white manga. Students will practice manga drawing styles and manga layout techniques, inspired by what they have seen. Manga volumes will also be available for reading and inspiration. Finished manga will be presented on last day. Note: this class is meant to be intro to manga/comic drawing, and will not cover advanced techniques such as screen tone application and color theory.

Please note this is also an art/drawing class and there is considerable drawing in addition to watching Japanese anime and films. Students must also have working laptop that they can bring to class on occasion.
Prerequisite:Preference will be given to existing Japanese students, though Japanese is not required
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40 for class supplies
Instructor:Ms. Clara Chi
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000217 • The Cave of Time
Travel through time for a creative, hands-on experience as you and your fellow students select, research, construct, and then interpret for hundreds of visitors, the paintings, carvings, and burials from some of the most famous caves in the world. When completed, our visitors will take a museum quality, flashlight journey through winding passages with rough walls, dripping water, and a partially excavated burial site. They will view the wonders of prehistoric art, which you recreated from caves such as Chauvet or Lascaux in France, or Cueva de las Manos in Argentina. Around the final corner, they will encounter the exquisite Buddhist artwork of China’s Dunhuang Caves.

The wide range of immersive work will include drawing (from projected images), painting, plaster, wood framing, cardboard and foam construction, water feature construction, exhibit lighting, research and writing tour programs, plus acting as tour guides or behind-the-scenes technicians. You will be able to sample some of each activity, or focus on an area of your particular interest. Along the way, you will be learning about the spiritual beliefs, artistic techniques, and lifestyles of the relevant prehistoric and ancient peoples.

As this is a hands-on building and performance based project, all the work will be done during class time. To facilitate construction, we will work on May 19th and take May 18th & May 20th off. No artistic skills are required—just enthusiasm, and a desire to be a part of creating something truly unique and memorable.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–4:00p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$20 for supplies
Instructor:Mr. John Marsh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000218 • Introduction to Southern Appalachia
Students will explore the history and current issues facing the Southern Appalachian region. By the end of the course, students will understand the historical development of the region, especially that of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians, as well as many current issues facing the area.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember—a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. when on campus
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$700 for travel expenses
Instructor:Dr. Mark Myers & Dr. Dain Kavars
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000219 • Visual Literacy: An Analytical Approach to Film
This demanding and engaging course invites students to review film analytically and “read” it in much the same way we take a critical approach to literature. We will view several contemporary films that focus on various types of prejudices that exist in our society today. Through rigorous discussion, panel presentations, analysis grids, and related readings participants will identify and expose some of the more obscure ways we discriminate against one another. My hope is that we can learn how to be more aware of veiled prejudice and consequently take active roles in ameliorating instances of discrimination through a proactive, informed approach.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:20 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$5 for class expenses
Instructor:Ms. Stephanie Nagelkirk
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000220 • Immigration in Indiana: Past, Present & Future
The goal of this course is to engage students and encourage exploration of social, economic, and political issues influencing immigration to Indiana. In order to understand our own histories, it is important to detail the personal struggles, community responses, and immigration legislation, both positive and negative, that have affected immigrant communities in Indiana. It is equally important to recognize the impact of global events on immigration patterns and other response through government policies. By remembering the tremendous benefits to Indiana contributed by these newcomers to our cultural, political, and economic heritage, we will be able to map a blueprint of our future. Immigration history is much more than statistics, more than dates and details of legislation, and even more than the individual memories of our neighbors and our ancestors. It is a story of hope and possibility, as well as of struggle and survival. Immigration history is a complex, living heritage that continues to shape and define the place we call home.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:18 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Jennifer Robinson
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000221 • Classic Science Fiction
This may term class will explore the early 20th century’s conception of the “future,” while examining the philosophical and psychological nature of humanity through film and written works. Students interested should expect to spend several hours reading each day, plus 2 daily time-commitments; a day session to discuss readings, and an evening session to watch formative sci-films together as a group.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–12:00 pm. & 2:00 pm.–5:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40
Instructor:Mr. Stephen Schuh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000222 • American Railroad Empire: History Meets Gaming
The class will combine study of western expansion through development of railroads in the U. S. between the 1820s and 1870s and playing historically themed railroad board games (Boxcars, 1830: railways & Robber Barons, and 1846: The Race to the Midwest).
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$12 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Sean Scott
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000223 • Russia since the Collapse, 1992-2018
A generation of Russian citizens have now grown up in Russia without directly experiencing Soviet communism. This class will examine how Russians have adapted to a different political, economic, social, intellectual, and theological environment. What were the prospects for a fundamental change that would realign the whole system or for significant within-system change that would ease the transition from Soviet authority to something different? Would the shifts be toward a more open and democratic political order or toward destabilization and disorder? What economic conditions would be altered or established; how would border ailments be handled; how would everyday living be changed or remain the same? Through various academic resources and research, students will explore the unfolding of the Russian Federation up to the current time.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:18 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Kenneth Stuart & Ms. Heather Rogers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000224 • Poetry Workshop
Students will read poems by contemporary poets, including many living poets, and essays about the craft of poetry. Through this reading, the class will look at specific aspects of poetics (such as image, line and syntax, sound, and diction) as well as poetic styles, forms, and traditions (such as free and blank verse, contemporary sonnets, erasure, and prose poems). The class will also include daily writing prompts, and we will discuss how to read and give feedback on poems in progress, how to revise, and how to workshop each other’s poems.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Rebecca Huehls
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000225 • Schola Antiqua
We will create a mock Greek/Roman schoolroom. The first week will involve researching, reading about, and recreating the material conditions present in an average ancient Roman school. We will research what teachers/students were like, what the school “system” was like, what subjects students studied and how they studied them, etc. We will also attempt to recreate several material objects—e.g. abaci, wax tablets, styli, even Greco-Roman foods—that would have been part of a student’s daily regimen. The project will culminate at the end of the second week, in which pairs of students will produce their own educational materials (e.g. videos, written dialogues, artwork, songs, etc.) meant to teach their peers about aspects of the ancient world. We may also dedicate the last day of the project to holding an “immersion” experience in which we pretend to be an ancient school and learn basic Latin and Greek, if time remains and students desire this. This should be open to all students at the Academy, though those with a Latin or Classics background will be more readily prepared. Class will meet for 3 hours per day with 3 hours of homework (mostly reading, note taking, and preparing to present on several smaller topics). Class itself will consist of lecture, general conversation, hands-on construction of materials, and immersion in topics relevant to ancient Greco-Roman education depending on the day.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$50 for supplies
Instructor:Mr. Evan Ward
Preferred Classroom:TBA

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Sheet.

Internships | May 14-25, 2018

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 25th, 2018 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or “mentor,” in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application; the May Term Internship Program Release form; the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent; and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 16, 2018. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 30, 2018. No proposals will be accepted after March 16, 2018.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/