May Term 2020 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course, to travel, or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience each academic year. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 13, 2020 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. No one is allowed to drop or add a May Term course. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 13, 2020. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship or those who have paid deposits for trips. For example, England or Yellowstone.
  3. All students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 13, 2020, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  4. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course, May Term trip, or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational travel not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

Course Descriptions

MT000001 • Habitat for Humanity – Muncie, IN
This hands-on course will require physical labor for building construction and rehab projects. Students will learn how to physically build structures, repair and paint previous structures, work with inventory, put in landscaping and help in any needed capacity for the Habitat for Humanity projects. Students will gain valuable experience in maintaining a house, landscaping and general property ownership. Students must be at least 16 years of age. Consent and insurance information from parents is required. Each student must take his or her own lunch. Students must keep a daily journal and submit it for evaluation. Hours worked in excess of 60 can be used for Community Service. Students will be exposed to the process of volunteering for a community organization and should feel more comfortable in doing so later in their lives.
Prerequisite:Students must be over 16 years of age; required to wear closed-toe shoes/boots what provide sturdy protection for their feet; and clothing consisting of t-shirt/sweatshirt and blue jeans for student protection against injuries and don’t care if it gets filthy or splattered with paint.
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40.00 per student for transportation
Instructor:Ms. Susie Cunningham & Ms. ChristyAnn Norton
Preferred Classroom:On-site location
MT000107 • The Chronicles of Narnia
The series of books by C. S. Lewis has fascinated readers of all ages for several decades. The seven books in The Chronicles of Narnia series will provide much room for class discussion and outside research. The three major motion pictures related to the series will also give opportunities to explore the themes and storylines of the books. Additionally, this course will delve beyond the stories to discuss the story behind the stories and the man behind the stories.

By participating in this course, students will become familiar with C. S. Lewis, a prominent 20th century novelist, academic, and philosopher. Students will analyze important themes represented in the literature of Lewis. Course work will include discussions of each book in the series, student presentations, and viewing of the movies from the series. Outside work will include reading, researching relevant topics, preparing in-class presentations, and writing short papers.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000168 • Math & Problem Solving in Popular Strategy Games
This May Term experience will explore the mathematics and problem solving strategies that are incorporated in the playing, and hopefully winning of board games. A variety of problem solving strategies in addition to mathematical concepts will be studied and applied in the board games chosen for this two week adventure. Included among these are optimization strategies, cooperative game strategies, risk vs. reward strategies, deductive reasoning, spatial orientation, and graph theory.

We will meet as a group 3 hours a day; you will independently meet 3 hours per day and keep a log of the time spent playing the games. Each individual will be required to submit a 2-page report on one of his or her favorite games played during the week. In this report, you should include a brief description of the game itself, why you liked playing the game, and explanation of the math and/or problem solving strategies you and others used to try to win the game, and which strategies seemed to be successful and which ones were not.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$20.00 to purchase games and supplies
Instructor:Mr. Joshua Ruark
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • Great Contemporary Film Directors
This course introduces students to several of the great film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Hong-jin Na, Bong Joon Ho, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are a handful of working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves, and find audiences. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. However, what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:2:00–3:30 p.m. & 5:45–8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000193 • Japanese Culture Through Anime & Film
Many people start their study of Japanese language because of the fascinating and fun culture of Japan. This course will introduce some aspects of Japanese culture that people can make into a lifelong hobby/learning interest. We will learn: how to play the difficulty game of Go, learn how to use an abacus, learn furoshiki which is the origami of handkerchiefs, draw some fun manga layouts, make Japanese lanterns with LED Candles, flower arrangement, play traditional Japanese cards and much more. We will also dive in to the profound and simple aesthetic of Japanese culture, such as Japanese tanka poetry, meditative walks around campus, visit to the Osley Art Museum to study their amazing artifacts from Sengoku Jidai. In the morning, anime or Japanese film will be selected which highlights the actual culture itself, and then in the afternoon, we will experience in real life what we saw on film. We will also watch classic anime films such as Studio Ghibli and Makoto Shinkai. Japanese students will be given preference, but all students are encouraged to sign up.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Clara Chi
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000211 • Yellowstone National Park
Students will learn about one of America’s greatest treasures: Yellowstone. They will explore the park daily and learn about its many unique features, history, flora and fauna. As a group, we will enter the park every day and we will travel throughout the park as we study different aspects of the park. Students will do research before the trip on topics related to history, science or tourism. They will present their projects in the park while visiting the area that applies to their project. In addition to travelling throughout the park, students will also plan a short hike that we will take in each area of the park. They will research different hikes and present them to the group with relevant features.

Students will be graded on his/her participation in the entire experience as well as individual projects assigned and graded by chaperones. These projects will be the student’s choice (with teacher guidance) and will involve research regarding one of the features of the park, the history of the park, various NPS policies regarding wildlife and fire suppression. Students will also plan a hike and provide details about the attractions on said hike.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 11, 2020 – May 22, 2020
Enrollment:11 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$1,798.01 for travel expenses
Instructor:Mr. Robert Smith & Dr. Sean Scott
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship
Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials.
Prerequisite:A Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations
MT000234 • French Film
This course is an introduction to French and francophone cinema. We will watch films representing a variety of time-periods, subjects, and genres. Directors may include Godard, Truffaut, Marker, Malle, Palcy, Denis, Berri, Jeunet, and others. I anticipate that we will watch about 8-10 films and discuss them. This is a discussion-based class. The students will analyze and compare French films, learn about French culture, present information and arguments, write response papers, and participate in discussions.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:12:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Maria Slocum
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000236 • Exploring & Understanding Architecture
An introduction to architecture4 (and urban planning), with an emphasis on the active exploration of the buildings and plan of the Ball State campus. Urban sketching and other investigative techniques will be used to record and analyze the overall built environment in which Academy students live. There will be some classroom activities as well, including discussion of important questions such as; why do Academy and Ball State building look the way they do? What is the purpose of each built structure? The purpose of this community as a whole? Does the form of the buildings and other built structures on campus confirm the stated purpose of a school and university – or reveal otherwise unstated goals and purposes? This class will be an active experience; participants should expect to be outside for several hours a day, and should expect considerable daily walking. Drawing materials will be provided.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$20.00 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000237 • A Literary Tour of England
Unfortunately, due to international travel restrictions imposed by Ball State University, this May Term trip has been canceled.
A literary tour and epic adventure in England for a group of students who are not ashamed of their love of literature. While in England, we will have a chance to visit places that inspired the literature we have been studying together—places like Hampton Court Palace, Bloomsbury, the National Gallery, London’s parks, The Tower of London, and the English countryside. All students will receive guided tours of each site. We will also go to theatrical productions of plays by Shakespeare and other leading playwrights.

Prior to this trip, in-class preparation will consist of acquainting students generally with the sites and places we will be touring, reading assignments focused on the same sites, instruction in safety procedures and trip protocol, and, finally, instruction in basic travel etiquette which will come in handy during the trip. Students will compose a ‘travel journal’ of their own reflecting on the day’s experiences. These compositions, while begun in England, will be completed and polished in-class upon returning to the Academy (5/21/20). We will check the journals for effort, originality, thoughtfulness and completion.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:May 11, 2020–May 22, 2020
Enrollment:11 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$3,563.00 for trip expenses
Instructor:Dr. Hatley Clifford & Mr. Evan Ward
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000238 • Women in STEM (Barrier Breakers & Unsung Heroes)
Who first saw the structure of DNA? Who calculated trajectories for the Apollo program’s moon landings? Who patented the technology that is still used in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth today? Who first used statistics in healthcare? Who wrote the first computer programs? How many of these do you think were women? In this course, we will read about and discuss women who made breakthroughs and broke barriers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics—some well-known, some not. As a final project, you will be writing a children’s book about one of the “mighty girls” as an exercise in how to get more girls interested in and excited about STEM.

The first week of class, we will be reading and discussion with the goal of learning about women who were innovators in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. The second week, we will focus on ways to share this knowledge at the most basic level—to children. If we want more women in STEM, we need to start at the beginning to get girls interested and excited about STEM. Planting those seeds in children’s minds through storybooks is one way to do this.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$32.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Jessica Edrington
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000239 • Physical Activity as a Path to Wellness
Exercise is a lifestyle strategy that can be used to immensely improve physical and mental health, which positively influences quality of life. This course will expose students to various modes of physical activity to demonstrate the variety of ways we can move our bodies to stay healthy. Students will go on short fieldtrips to various locations on BSU’s campus as well as local exercise facilities to firsthand experience various workout styles (such as yoga, aerobics, and resistance exercise). Additionally, a variety of health topics will be explored, including the role an active lifestyle plays for weight management, disease prevention, and mental health as well as strategies for healthy nutrition. Students will be expected to walk a few miles per day, engage in each planned exercise activity, and wear proper exercise attire, including tennis shoes.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$50.00 for field trips
Instructor:Dr. Bridget Lester
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000240 • Procedural Rhetoric & Roleplaying Games
Every simulation makes claims about reality; every role presumes subjects who fill fit into that groove. Whether or not we realize it, games hail us—role playing games in particular—asking us to become certain kinds of people, and teach us to see the world in certain ways. In Procedural Rhetoric & Roleplaying Games, we will explore the implicit arguments about the world and ourselves, which games make, analyzing gameplay and playfully analyzing the way we play. The course will culminate in a week of development and playtesting where groups will make their own examples of procedural rhetoric, creating original games and sharing them with the class.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$10.00 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Phillip Lobo
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000241 • Design & Build an Escape Room
Immerse yourself in a hands-on, creative experience as you and your fellow students design, construct, and then operate for visitors an “escape room” attraction. The wide range of creative experiences including creative writing, puzzle research and design, logic problems, wood framing, painting, set and prop construction, character performance and lighting and sound design.

Together you and your classmates will create 2 parallel stories of a missing turn-of-the-century Egyptologist and an ancient Egyptian mystery with a lost tomb. You will research, design, and build for the visitors to solve/find/build: logic puzzles, number puzzles, hidden pictures, hidden items, optics puzzles, secret puzzle boxes, mini Rube Goldberg machines, map deciphering, secret codes, and other physical and intellectual obstacles. Finally, you will learn presentation techniques and interactive skills as you introduce the experience, perform characters, and operate the lights, sound, doors, and other mechanics for the visitors.

As this is a hands-on building and performance based project, all the work will be done during class time. No artistic skills are required—just enthusiasm, and a desire to be a part of creating something truly unique and memorable.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:18 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for supplies
Instructor:Mr. John Marsh & Mr. Steve Schuh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000242 • Embroidery 101 or How to Relax with Purpose
Embroidery in various forms has existed as long as man has been able to produce fabric. It is the art of decorating material (mainly textile fabric) by means of a needle and thread/yarn. Basic techniques include crewel, cross-stitch (counted and stamped), needlepoint, and quilting. In Embroidery 101, we will learn how to do basic stitches (outlines, satin, backstitch, cross-stitch), as well as learn how to follow the “map” that goes along with completing a cross-stitch project. We will complete two projects during the course of May Term, first a dishtowel that requires the outline, satin, and backstitches and then a stamped cross-stitch project. Students are expected to have two completed projects by the end of the two-week May Term.

This course will be completely hands-on. Students should gain an understanding of the history of this art form and learn how creative, relaxing, mentally stimulating it can be. Students will also see how this skill can be combined with other methods of relaxing (movie watching, conversation with others, tea-drinking) to make free or leisure time relaxing but productive or meaningful.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Heather Rogers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000243 • Personal Financial Success in the Modern World
This class is designed to teach you all the things you want to know about adulating that school does not teach you and that I can fit into a two-week period. The major grade for this course will be the two-week long budget project where you will need to research your assigned profession, choose a place to live, a way to get around, insurance, and other associated costs and determine a monthly budget. Class times will be spent learning about various pieces of adult life: insurance, banking, investing and loans, interviewing, cooking basics, taxes, healthy relationships, etc. The ideas came from what alumni wish they would have known before leaving school so I hope the topics will be helpful. Note, that while this should be an enjoyable class, it will be work, and I do expect serious commitment to this, so be sure you are prepared to learn and work during this typically fun two weeks.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m.–2:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$50.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Megan Wright
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000244 • Musicals!
In this course, we will be all about musicals! We will watch several musicals together and analyze their production, performance, and literary elements. There may be spontaneous singing. There may be choreographed dancing (optional, of course). One thing is for sure: there will be lots of friendship. The students will learn about the literary, cinematic, and theatrical genre of the musicals; see the development of musicals throughout history; and explore the various components of musicals, from their narrative themes, and songs to their production, staging, performances, and cinematography. The class will also be creating our own musical performance.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Hatley Clifford & Mr. Evan Ward
Preferred Classroom:TBA

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

May Term Internships | May 11-22, 2020

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 22nd, 2020 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or mentor, in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application; the May Term Internship Program Release form; the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent; and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 13, 2020. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 31, 2020. No proposals will be accepted after March 13, 2020.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/