May Term 2017 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course, to travel, or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience each academic year. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 17, 2017 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. No one is allowed to drop or add a May Term course. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 17, 2017. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship or those who have paid deposits for trips (for example: Japan, Ireland, Germany, West Virginia, or Yellowstone).
  3. All students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 17, 2017, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  4. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course, May Term trip, or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational travel not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Sheet.

Course Descriptions

MT000001 • Habitat for Humanity
Learn some construction skills and help others at the same time – work for Habitat for Humanity. Greater Muncie Indiana Habitat for Humanity, Inc. is a non-profit organization founded on the beliefs that every person should have a decent, safe and affordable place to live. Habitat works with volunteers from all walks of life to build decent, affordable housing in partnership with families who will live in them. In addition, Habitat staff and volunteers work on rehabilitating existing homes and helping with home maintenance. Most of each day will be filled with physical labor. For example, we may be painting homes, pressure washing homes, landscaping, maintaining yards, building decks or ramps, building walkways (In 2016, we built a walkway with a guide wire so a blind woman could go to her mailbox on her own), or general cleanup. Students must be at least 16 years of age. Consent and insurance information from parents is required. Each student must take his or her own lunch. Students must keep a daily journal and submit it for evaluation. Hours worked in excess of 60 can be used for Community Service. This is a hands-on course. Students will be exposed to the process of volunteering for a community organization and should feel more comfortable in doing so later in their lives.
Prerequisite:Students must be over 16 years of age, and are required to wear shoes/boots that provide sturdy protection for their feet and clothing they don’t mind getting filthy or splattered with paint.
Meeting Time:8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$20.00 per student for transportation
Instructor:Dr. Franklin Shobe & Ms. Susie Cunningham
Preferred Classroom:On-site location
MT000015 • Spring Flora of Indiana
This is a “Field Botany & Ecology” course that will emphasize the skills and techniques involved in Plant Taxonomy and Ecosystem Analysis. We will investigate a variety of physiographic regions and habitat types in Indiana and become familiar with their Spring Flora. The class will meet in lab to work on plant morphology and basic taxonomic skills. Field trips will involve travel, hiking and camping in various locations of floristic and geologic interest in Indiana. Students will be expected to keep a “field journal” and take part in group projects. Additionally, they should expect field quizzes and a final taxonomic exam. This course is a field camp experience and participants should expect to work hard and play hard.
Prerequisite:No academic prerequisites are necessary. However, due to the field nature of the course, students should be prepared physically to hike in the rain for a few miles in rolling terrain, eat outside and sleep under camping conditions.
Meeting Time:Morning meetings of the course will meet from 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Afternoon meetings will meet from 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. or as required for travel considerations.
Enrollment:7 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$110.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Mr. Mike Mayfield
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000081 • Creative Writing
This is a workshop in imaginative writing, with practice in short fiction, poetry, and drama. You will try your hand at a variety of exercises, write inside and outside of class, allow your classmates and teacher to read your writing, and read some of your writing aloud. You will also read and analyze published examples of writing. To complete the 60 hours required for a May Term class, you’ll spend four hours class and two hours on homework. The teacher’s primary job will be not to judge your writing, but to provide a variety of ways to practice the art and craft and pleasure of creative writing. Writers of all levels, including beginners, are welcome. NOTE: Priority goes to students who have not taken any Academy creative writing class: the semester-long Creative Writing or a quarter class in Writing Fiction or Writing Poetry.

Students should learn a variety of techniques for generating imaginative writing and develop their skill in analyzing and appreciating creative writing. During class, students will discuss, engage in a variety of exercises, and read aloud from their written work. Outside class, the student will write, visit the art museum, and work together to compose, practice and perform an original play.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Margaret Smith
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000084 • Japan Trip
This year, students will go to Japan for a 10-day travel around the country, visiting major cities across the Honshu Island. They will explore traditional places such as thousand-year old temples and castles in Kyoto and Nara. They will visit the large shopping districts of Tokyo and Osaka, the two biggest cities in Japan, as well as its most famous museums and attractions such as Tokyo Skytree Tower (the tallest and most recently completed tower in Tokyo and Dotonbori, a neon-lit shopping district in Osaka. Students will also visit Hiroshima for the Atom Bomb Memorial, and stop by at Itsukushima, a Shinto shrine known as one of the three most beautiful landscapes of Japan. Students will be immersed in Japanese culture, such as sleeping in tatami (bamboo mat) rooms and on Japanese style bedding, eating Japanese food, and have optional activities such as karaoke/visiting a traditional hot springs. We will visit two museums, Studio Ghibli Museum (anime museum) and Miraikan, an acclaimed science and technology museum in Tokyo.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 15, 2017 – May 26, 2017
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:$3,500.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Ms. Clara Chi & Mrs. Jennifer Robinson
Preferred Classroom:Japan
MT000107 • The Chronicles of Narnia
The release of the three major motion pictures over the last decade renewed interest in The Chronicles of Narnia, but this series of books by C. S. Lewis has fascinated readers of all ages for several decades. The seven books in the series will provide much room for class discussion and outside research. Some dispute exists among scholars as to whether the Narnia world was intended by Lewis to be an allegory. This course will delve beyond the stories to discuss the story behind the stories and the man behind the stories.

By participating in this course, students will become familiar with C. S. Lewis, a prominent 20th century novelist, academic, and philosopher. Students will analyze important themes represented in the literature of Lewis. Course work will include discussions of each book in the series, student presentations, and viewing of the movies from the series. Outside work will include reading, researching relevant topics, preparing in-class presentations, and writing short papers.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000124 • Ireland Trip
An adventure experience in both the Irish Republic and the less-visited Northern Ireland of the United Kingdom — two countries, one island. Imagine walking along a grassy cliff above the ocean, with swirling sea birds overhead, choppy waves in the water below, and a misty castle in the distance. Imagine hiking up a craggy hillside, and pausing to turn around and take in a panoramic view of Ireland’s legendarily beautiful countryside — green fields with grazing sheep, distant mountains with hidden valleys. Imagine shopping for a picnic lunch in a rural village with thatched-roof cottages, or eating fish and chips while walking along a bustling city street.

The trip will of course immerse students in the culture of modern Ireland, but it will also be a focused exposure to Irish history. As the expected trip itinerary will take us through Northern Ireland (part of the United Kingdom with England, Wales, and Scotland) as well as the Republic of Ireland (an independent country), the focus will be on the historical circumstances, from the Reformation through the twentieth-century, that explain this political divide.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 15, 2017 – May 26, 2017
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:$2,800.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold & Mrs. Megan Wright
Preferred Classroom:Ireland
MT000147 • Math Problem Solving Seminar
What proportion of palindromic numbers between 1000 and 10000 are divisible by 7? What is the sum of the digits of the sum of the sum of the digits of 4444 raised to the 4444 power? If f(x) is the minimum of the numbers 4x+1, x+2, and -2x+4, what is the maximum value of f(x)?

There are many interesting and challenging questions which appear on high school math contests. In this seminar, students will have an opportunity to learn and work on techniques for attacking hard problems such as those found in the Indiana Math League, AMC-12, and American Invitational Math Exam contests. Group work and student presentations will be important parts of the seminar. Expect to be challenged, learn some mathematics & have fun.
Prerequisite:Pre-calculus for AP 2 or equivalent, and an interest in solving problems
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:$5.00 for copies
Instructor:Mr. John Rajca
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000168 • Math & Problem Solving in Popular Strategy Games
This May Term experience will explore the mathematics and problem solving strategies that are incorporated in the playing, and hopefully winning of board games. A variety of problem-solving strategies in addition to mathematical concepts will be studied and applied in the board games chosen for this two-week adventure. Included among these are optimization strategies, cooperative game strategies, risk vs. reward strategies, deductive reasoning, spatial orientation, and graph theory.

We will meet as a group 3 hours a day; you will independently meet 3 hours per day and keep a log of the time spent playing the games. Each individual will be required to submit a two-page report on one of their favorite games played during the week. In this report, you should include a brief description of the game itself, why you liked playing the game, and explanation of the math and/or problem solving strategies you and/or others used to try to win the game, and which strategies seemed to be successful and which ones were not. We will be coordinating with Mr. Marsh’s Analysis and Design of Board Games course in terms of games and space in order to aid their group in the analysis of different styles of game play.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$15.00 to purchase games
Instructor:Mr. Joshua Ruark
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • The Best Contemporar Film Directors
This course introduces students to seven of the finest American film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Wes Anderson, Hong-jin Na, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. But what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. & 5:45 p.m. – 8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000186 • Central Appalachia: Past and Present
This course will explore the history and current problems in the Central Appalachian region. We will spend a few days analyzing the history of the region, with a particular focus on the Coal Wars of the early 20th century. At the end of the first week, we will travel to West Virginia to explore this history in the field. There will also be opportunities for hiking excursions, which will fit into the theme of the course since tourism is becoming a larger part of the local economy.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A-D*
Fees:$491.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Dr. Mark Myers & Dr. Dain Kavars
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000194 • Technology in the Movies
This class will take a look at how technology is used in the movies and how it has changed over the years. We will start out in the ’70s with movies like Logan’s Run and Star Wars. Then into the ’80s with War Games, Real Genius, and TRON. In the ’90s we will cover Sneakers, Hackers, and The Net. We will also be covering animated movies such as Toy Story, The Incredibles, Wreck-It Ralph, Up, Despicable Me, and Pixels.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40.00 for movies & food
Instructor:Mr. Jon Grady
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000197 • Germany Trip – Holocaust Tour
Consider literal and metaphorical barriers: fences, prison cells, concrete walls, barbed wire, for instance. What are their purpose(s)? In their limitation of physical movement, they also serve to control the thought and freedom of those who find themselves encased within their boundaries. In Michel Foucault’s pivotal text Discipline and Punish, he discusses the concept of the panopticon, the idea of being surveilled 24/7 and the resulting psychological effects on the prisoner. How does this physical structure work to perpetuate the power of those who built it? We will seek to answer such questions as: Who is in power? What grounds that power? How is that power maintained? How is it perpetuated? How does one challenge that power? As we tour concentration camp remnants left over from the Holocaust, an old prison from the Cold War, and a refugee camp currently in operation, we will seek to draw connections between physical and metaphorical barriers and their extension and preservation of power.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 15, 2017 – May 26, 2017
Enrollment:10 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$3,500.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Ms. Stephanie Nagelkirk & Mr. Steve Schuh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000203 • Geometrical Optics
Geometrical optics is the study of light based on the Laws governing the phenomenon of Reflection and Refraction. The course will include image formations by plane mirror, spherical mirrors, thin lenses, and combinations of mirrors and lenses; Lens Maker’s Equation and power of lenses; and dispersion of light by a prism. Lab and hands-on activities will be an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Hasan Fakhruddin
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000204 • Introduction to Aquatic Biology
Have you ever wondering what kinds of creatures live in your neighborhood ponds, lakes and streams? Do you like being outside and do not mind getting wet/muddy? Are you concerned about clean water and/or a healthy environment? Well, then, Introduction to Aquatic Biology is the course for you! We will cover information regarding just about anything that lives in fresh water: from Anabaena sp. to zebra mussels; and ephemeral ponds to raging rivers. This course will focus on aquatic ecology with hands-on activities in both the laboratory and in the field (or more accurately – in the water!) We will meet daily from 9:00 a.m. until about 4:00 p.m., and each day may consist of lecture, lab activities, discussions, and/or field trips. We have three off-campus field trips planned for this class. The field trips include physical activity that may be strenuous at time, but the relatively physically fit academy student should be able to keep up.

The students will be able to describe the connection between organisms and their environment, demonstrate an understanding of energy flow and nutrient cycling, compare the communities of different aquatic environments to determine the impact of human activities and identify aquatic organisms.
Prerequisite:The ability to swim.
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for field trip expenses
Instructor:Dr. Diane Kallmeyer
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000205 • Colored Milk and Cabbage Indicators
Students will be involved in a service-learning project between the Academy and Back to School Teachers Store. These students will be creating, demonstrating, and assembling for “take out” age or subject appropriate science experiments. The materials for these experiments will be found on site (Teachers Store).
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:8 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks and supplies
Instructor:Mrs. Cheryl Kellogg
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000206 • Analysis and Design of Board Games
Fire up your creativity, analytical skills, and sense of fun as we delve into the structure and design of popular board games. Through gameplay, research and discussion, we will focus on the game mechanics and thematic elements which come together to make enjoyable and popular games. Along the way, we will also investigate the trends in the rapidly growing field of board games. The class will then combine that information with their own creative ideas as they design an original board game. Gameplay and new game testing will be done in conjunction with Mr. Ruark’s course on the Math and Problem Solving Strategies in Popular Strategy Games.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$15.00 to purchase supplies
Instructor:Mr. John Marsh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000207 • Integrating Forensic Psychology & Historical Crimes
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the forensic tools used to identify serial offenders and analyze patterns that may predict future offenses and/or victims involved in violent crimes. Students will learn about some of the leading psychological theories on sociopathy and psychopathy and how these factor into constructing offender profiles. This course will take a historical, literary, and cinematographic approach to reviewing front-page crimes over the last 150 years. This will be accomplished by reading A Devil in the White City, an award-winning historical novel relaying the crimes of H. H. Holmes at the time of the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago; examining how Holmes’ crimes parallel those of the fictional character known as Sweeney Todd; using historical resources about the crimes and psychopathy of Ed Gein; examining how Gein’s crimes were the impetus for the famed Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece Psycho; and using episodes of “Most Evil” in which noted forensic psychiatrist, Michael Stone, elucidates his method of categorizing criminals involved in violent crimes. This course will climax in an overnight trip to Chicago where students will participate in two historical tours: “Devil in the White City Tour” and Chicago’s “True Crime and Mystery Tour.” Students will be assessed through a written analysis and oral PowerPoint presentation where groups will be required to develop a sound criminal profile in regard to a historical serial killer and examine how law enforcement forensically solved the crimes and identified the violent offender.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$300 for field trip expenses & textbooks
Instructor:Mr. Les McSparrin
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000209 • Reading and Analyzing Short Stories
The short story is sometimes an under-appreciated art form. Within the space of a few pages, an author must weave a story that is compelling, create characters readers care about and drive the story to its ultimate conclusion. This short story May Term course will include the best short story writers of all time, authors who have mastered the art of the short story, turning condensed pieces into memorable works of literature. Students will read, analyze, and discuss short stories written in English or famous works that have been translated into English including major authors such as O. Henry, Maupassant, Twain, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Joyce, Faulkner, O’Conner, Salinger, Munro, and many more. Students will do an in-depth study of one of the great short story writers that will involve research on the author and analysis of other short stories not studied in class. They will present their study to their classmates as we study that author in the course. This course will meet a minimum of three hours each day.
Prerequisite:None. Not open to students who took the Short Story quarter class last year.
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Christine Ney
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000210 • Highlights in German History through the Centuries
Students will learn about pivotal events in German history through literature, documentaries, and movies. Starting with the Battle of the Teutoburger Forest in AD 9 where the Germanic tribes defeated the Romans, we will explore the time of the Frankish empire and Charlemagne after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. 2017 is the 500th anniversary of the Reformation which changed German, European, and world history decisively. The German population suffered the most in the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) which followed the clash between the Catholic and Protestant churches. After the French Revolution whole Europe was affected by the Napoleonic Wars which ended with the Battle of the Nations in Leipzig, Germany, in 1813. The 19th century is marked by the rise of the Prussian state with its capital Berlin. The 1848 revolution by which German people demanded more rights failed. The political maneuvers under the Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck brought about the unification of the many German states in 1871. Germany became a super power which led to conflicts with European countries and eventually the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Germany lost and had to sign the humiliating Treaty of Versailles in 1918. The Weimar Republic which followed did not succeed. The worldwide depression and unemployment brought about the rise of Hitler and the National Socialist Party, annexation and invasion of European countries, persecution of the Jews and dissident citizens, which eventually led to World War II with a total defeat of Germany. Germany was occupied by the victorious allies. Germany became divided into GDR, East Germany under the influence of Russia, and FRG, West Germany. To prevent East Germans from fleeing to the West, the Berlin wall was built in 1961. The fall of the wall was celebrated in 1989. After Gorbachev came to power, the reunification of Germany in 1990 became a reality. The Two plus Four Treaty was signed by representatives of West and East Germany, the Soviet Union, Great Britain, France, and the USA.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Gislind Pentecost
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000211 • Yellowstone National Park
Students will learn about one of America’s greatest treasures: Yellowstone. They will explore the park daily and learn about its many unique features, history, flora and fauna. As a group we will enter the park every day and we will travel throughout the park as we study different aspects of the park. Students will do research before the trip on topics related to history, science or tourism. They will present their projects in the park while visiting the area that applies to their project. In addition to travelling throughout the park, students will also plan a short hike that we will take in each area of the park. They will research different hikes and present them to the group with relevant features.

Students will be graded on his/her participation in the entire experience as well as individual projects assigned and graded by chaperones. These projects will be the student’s choice (with teacher guidance) and will involve research regarding one of the features of the park, the history of the park, various NPS policies regarding wildlife and fire suppression. Students will also plan a hike and provide details about the attractions on said hike.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 15, 2017 – May 26, 2017
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$1,900.00 for travel expenses
Instructor:Mr. Robert Smith & Mr. Christopher Reid
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000212 • It Seemed Nothing Ever Happened – A Look at the 1970s
This course will examine the phenomena of the decade the 1970s. Was it just an extension of the 1960s, the beginning of the 1980s, or a decade which stands on its own merits? Through newspapers, new journals, films, books, art, music, theater, and historical journals, we shall comb the decade exploring the economics, politics, culture, society, and intellectual threads which give this era a rich and lasting impact on American society and the world.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Ken Stuart
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000213 • Shakespeare & The War of the Roses in Text and Performance
The War of the Roses, the English Civil War, was a bloody conflict between two branches of the Plantagenet kings of England. The Lancasters used the symbol of the red rose, the Yorks used the symbol of the white rose, hence the War of the Roses. Shakespeare chronicles the war in four of his very early plays: Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, and 3, and Richard III. Although the early plays lack the greatness of his later masterpieces, the early plays reveal a skillful playwright who can tell good stories with fascinating characters. The class will consider the plays as texts, and also as a performance. The recent BBC production of The Hallow Crown which portrays the four plays will be the major performance guide, but parts of other productions of the plays will also be incorporated in the class.

We will be in class Monday through Friday each week. We will spend two hours in the morning considering the text of the plays, and then, two hours in the afternoon considering the film versions of the plays. We will spend two days on each of the plays with the other two used for reading, researching, and completing the individual class project. We will be reading, both silently and aloud from the text, perhaps staging some scenes, and discussing characters, performances, writing techniques, and plot structures. We will also spend some time on relating the plays to the political history of Shakespeare’s own era.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$8.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Mr. Richard Willis
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship
Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials.
Prerequisite:A Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Sheet.

Internships | May 15-26, 2017

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 26th, 2017 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or “mentor,” in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application; the May Term Internship Program Release form; the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent; and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 17, 2017. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 31, 2017. No proposals will be accepted after March 17, 2017.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/