May Term 2021 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements. However, the seniors of the Class of 2021 will only be required to earn 0.5 credits for May Term due to the cancellation of May Term 2020 due to the COVID pandemic.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience for 2021. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 19, 2021 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. There will be no drop or add options for May Term courses. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 19, 2021. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship.
  3. Students who are completing the remainder of the 2020-2021 school year as an “Online Student” must choose from May Term courses which list the Course Delivery Method as “Hybrid” or “Online Only.” Students in residence may choose from May Term courses using any of the three Course Delivery Methods.
  4. Students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 19, 2021, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  5. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational events not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

Course Descriptions

MT000122 • Appalachia on Film

This course will provide a brief introduction to issues dealing with the Appalachian region, particularly Southern and Central Appalachia. This course will focus primarily on how the region has been perceived in American popular culture through film.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Mark Myers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000173 • Beginning Tennis 101

The goal of this class is designed for students with no previous tennis experience. Students will learn how to play tennis, basic tennis strokes, information on the history of tennis and famous tennis players. Participants will need to bring a tennis racquet and a NEW can of tennis balls. (Students with tennis experience do not need to apply).

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Susie Cunningham
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • The Best Contemporary Film Directors

This course introduces students to several of the great film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Hong-jin Na, Bong Joon Ho, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are a handful of working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves, and find audiences. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. However, what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:2:00–3:30 p.m. & 5:45–8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000187 • Introduction to Muay Thai

Muay Thai is the cultural martial art of Thailand. It dates back several hundred years and was developed as a form of close-combat that used the entire body as a weapon. Since this is an introduction course, participants will not strike or be struck by anyone using force. We will mostly practice the techniques in a shadow-boxing style. Participants should provide a pair of athletic shorts, sneakers, clean socks & t-shirt which will be used during the hands-on, instructional portion of the class. The classroom instruction will just be normal clothes. If you also have a simple jump rope, this would also be beneficial. If you do not have a jump rope, another exercise option will be available.

This course is meant to introduce the participant to self-defense techniques as practiced in Muay Thai that can be used in and out of organized competitions. It is also meant to provide the participant with a physical exercise class as well as a historical perspective of the art of Muay Thai as well as other similar arts.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00–11:00 a.m. (Online) & 12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. (Face-to-face)
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Bob Smith
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000193 • Japanese Culture Through Anime & Film

In this class, we will watch Japanese anime and discuss the components of a good anime – the story, illustration, and differences in societal values between West and East. Students will vote on anime which explores their interest in Japanese society and culture. Suggested series include Studio Ghibli films, Makoto Shinkai films (Your Name), Naruto, Detective Conan, Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure, Boku no Hero Academia. We will also explore the otaku culture in both Japan and America regarding cult popularity of anime/manga. Class will consist of both viewing and discussion. No Japanese proficiency required, although certainly helpful.

The students will exchange opinions on anime watched. Through discussion, students will understand the differences in Western/Eastern ways of thinking, explore social dynamics in both Eastern/Western cultures, learn (exciting) Japanese history, examine modern Japanese culture today, appreciate plot development and maybe learn some more Japanese.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Online only
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Clara Chi
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000206 • Analysis and Design of Board Games

Fire up your creativity, analytical skills, and sense of fun as we delve into the structure and design of popular board games. Through gameplay, research and discussion, we will focus on the game mechanics and thematic elements which come together to make enjoyable and popular games. Along the way, we will also investigate the trends in the rapidly growing field of board games. The class will then combine that information with their own creative ideas as they design an original board game.

This is a hands-on participation course. The students will be honing their analytical skills as they break apart the elements of games they play in order to see how they contribute to the overall experience. They will also research the board game industry in order to identify trends. They will synthesize that material with a general look at today’s society in attempt to answer the question of why board games are currently experiencing such a surge of popularity. Finally, they will draw upon those understandings as they fire up their creativity and design an original board game.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. John Marsh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship

Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials. Please direct any questions about May Term Internships to Mr. Aaron Lake in WA 183 and the completed application forms need to be submitted to Ms. Candace Manship in WA 170.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only, plus the Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations
MT000227 • Sketching History: Past – Present – Future

A hands-on, creative exploration of history through on-site sketching and crafting. Students will alternate between sketching the landscape of present-day Muncie and BSU campus, and creating additional images (or even dioramas) to imagine the landscapes of the past and future. Students should be prepared for extended walking to explore sketching sites on and around campus. There will be some reading and classroom discussion, as well as hands-on art and crafting. There is no cost for materials. The students will be expected to independently work on their drawing projects in the afternoons and other times.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000233 • Escape to Middle-Earth: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Fantasy Epics

Follow the adventures of hobbits, elves, dwarves, and men in a timeless narrative of friendship, duty and the cataclysmic struggle of good versus evil as envisioned by the world-renowned Oxford professor and fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien. Students will study Tolkien’s life and influences on his thinking, read and discuss The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy, and compare his works to Peter Jackson’s Hollywood adaptions.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$22.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Dr. Sean Scott
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000234 • French Film

This course is an introduction to French. We will watch films representing a variety of time-periods, subjects, and genres. Directors may include Cocteau, Godard, Truffaut, Marker, Malle, Palcy, Denis, Berri, Jeunet, Boon, and others. I anticipate that we will watch about 10 films and discuss them. This is a discussion-based class. The students will analyze and compare French films, learn about French culture, present information and arguments, write response papers, and participate in discussions. No previous experience in French is required for the class.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Online only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Maria Slocum
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000236 • Women in STEM (Barrier Breakers & Unsung Heroes)

Who first saw the structure of DNA? Who calculated trajectories for the Apollo program’s moon landings? Who patented the technology that is still used in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth today? Who first used statistics in healthcare? Who wrote the first computer programs? How many of these do you think were women? In this course, we will read about and discuss women who made breakthroughs and broke barriers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics—some well-known, some not. As a final project, you will be writing a children’s book about one of the “mighty girls” as an exercise in how to get more girls interested in and excited about STEM.

The first week of class, we will be reading and discussion with the goal of learning about women who were innovators in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. The second week, we will focus on ways to share this knowledge at the most basic level—to children. If we want more women in STEM, we need to start at the beginning to get girls interested and excited about STEM. Planting those seeds in children’s minds through storybooks is one way to do this.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Jessica Edrington
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000237 • Embroidery 101 or How to Relax with Purpose

Embroidery in various forms has existed as long as man has been able to produce fabric. It is the art of decorating material (mainly textile fabric) by means of a needle and thread/yarn. Basic techniques include crewel, cross-stitch (counted and stamped), needlepoint, and quilting. In Embroidery 101, we will learn how to do basic stitches (outlines, satin, backstitch, cross-stitch), as well as learn how to follow the “map” that goes along with completing a cross-stitch project. We will complete two projects during the course of May Term, first a dishtowel that requires the outline, satin, and backstitches and then a stamped cross-stitch project. Students are expected to have two completed projects by the end of the two-week May Term.

This course will be completely hands-on. Students should gain an understanding of the history of this art form and learn how creative, relaxing, mentally stimulating it can be. Students will also see how this skill can be combined with other methods of relaxing (movie watching, conversation with others, tea-drinking) to make free or leisure time relaxing but productive or meaningful. Both experienced and non-experienced stitchers are welcome.

Students will need to purchase their own materials. They will need an Embroidery Hoop, Embroidery Needle, Embroidery Floss, Cross-stitch kit, Blue-striped vintage towel or flour sack towel, Embroidery Stamp, Scissors (Embroidery scissors preferred, but not required). The cost for these supplies will be about $20.00. The instructor has some materials that students will be able to use, but if students would like to choose their own embroidery stamps or kits, they can be purchased on their own.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None – students purchase own supplies
Instructor:Ms. Heather Rogers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000239 • Musicals!

In this course, we will be all about musicals! We will watch several musicals together and analyze their production, performance, and literary elements. There may be spontaneous singing. There may be choreographed dancing (optional, of course). One thing is for sure: there will be lots of friendship.

The students will learn about the literary, cinematic, and theatrical genre of the musicals; see the development of musicals throughout history; and explore the various components of musicals, from their narrative themes, and songs to their production, staging, performances, and cinematography. The class will also be creating our own musical performance.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Online only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Hatley Clifford
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000241 • Exploring Drawing and Painting

Now that we have completed final exams, exercise the creative part of your brain and have fun exploring drawing and painting. Imagination – essential! Talent and previous experience – not required! For this class, we will explore different media for creating two dimensional art works. During the first week, students will be introduced to basic art concepts of shading, use of color, how to convey perception, creating the illusion of 3-D, and composition. For the second week, we will have “theme” days to inspire your creativity as you work with the medium and style of your choice.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:10 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$50.00 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Diane Kallmeyer
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000242 • Storytelling

Every person has a unique story to tell. Through the art of storytelling, students can build connections with their peers, improve their writing and public speaking skills, and bring their own personal experiences to the classroom. The Moth (themoth.org) will inspire the style of the story telling. To develop their stories, students will conduct a number of activities aimed to identify the fundamentals of story design as well as to brainstorm story ideas for the chosen theme. After students’ stories are developed, each student will share their story live with the class. The goal of the class will be for students to feel empowered that their human experience matters.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Bridget Lester
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000243 • Story-Machines: Games & Narrative Creative Workshop

This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore and engage with narrative-producing games, both for writing and roleplaying, merging game and narrative design in a creative, collaborative environment. The first week will be spent exploring and using roleplaying games designed by independent artists, creating stories and learning about contemporary systems and methods. The second week will be dedicated to student-led projects where groups will create, playtest, and share their own narrative-producing games.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$5.00 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Phillip Lobo
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000244 • Artificial Intelligence

This May Term course on artificial intelligence will explore ways by which it is similar or different from human intelligence. Along the way, some of the key techniques of machine learning will be introduced. Students will use Python programming language to build machine-learning models on real-life data sets. Familiarity of a programming language is desirable; however, no prior knowledge of Python is necessary for enrolling into this course.

Course Delivery Method:Online only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Sazzad Nasir
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000245 • Introduction to Group Theory

Group Theory is the study of algebraic structures called groups. In this course, we will go through many examples of groups and learn about their importance in mathematics. We will be going over the following: Preliminaries (Functions, Induction, Complex numbers, Integers, Equivalence Relations), Symmetries of a Square & Dihedral Groups, Axiomatic Definition of Groups and Basic Properties, Finite Groups and Subgroups, Cyclic Groups. We will also cover Permutation Groups, Isomorphisms of Groups, Cosets and Lagrange’s Theorem, Normal Subgroups and Factor Groups and Group Homomorphisms and the First Isomorphism Theorem.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Michael Niemeier
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000246 • Movies of the Great Depression

Hollywood’s Golden Age of Movies spans the historical period between the Great Depression and World War II (1919-1945). This two-week course will focus on the role of movies through the Great Depression. The historical context and roles these movies played during this time will be explored. Students will write a short synopsis of the film viewed, engage in discussions, and will read short articles providing contextual support for the time-period. At the end of this course, students will create a paper that traces one of the themes discovered during this course.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$15.00 for films
Instructor:Ms. ChristyAnn Norton
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000247 • Atlas Shrugged – Why Is It My Problem?

This course will read, analyze, and discuss Ayn Rand’s seminal work, Atlas Shrugged. The course will consist of three hours in class discussing the discussing the ideas and themes of the book as well as viewing the film adaptations of the three parts of the book. Outside of class, students will read the text and write a series of essays/papers based on the themes of the book.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Face-to-face only
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Josh Ruark
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000248 • Language and Gender

We will explore how gender appears in language as both a social and linguistic category. In the process, we will look at a variety of world languages to see how grammar and gender fit together; in addition to exploring what gender is. Students will examine specific linguistic topics like pronouns and neo-pronouns, so-called ‘grammatical’ gender of languages like Spanish or French, noun-class systems in Bantu languages, the singular they, and more. During the second week, the students will learn basic linguistic research techniques and will engage in a research project of their own, e.g. by reading and/or collecting data and analyzing it in some way.

NOTE: Having taken either Introduction to Linguistics or study of a world language other than English is required in order to register for the course.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$41.00 for textbook
Instructor:Dr. Evan Ward
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000249 • Comprehensive Calculus

The national Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam is a comprehensive and challenging assessment that covers the content of Calculus 1 and Calculus 2. The text provides interesting, non-routine problems that explore calculus in contextual situations. This course will use these AP-style questions to explore many interesting calculus topics. In the process, students will gain a thorough review of the Calculus 1 and Calculus 2 material before the date of the national AP exam. Students will make class presentations on relevant topics, will collaborate on application problems, will take practice AP Exams, and will review a lot of calculus! Additional activities will include visits by professionals in math-related fields to survey the careers available in the broader mathematics community. We will also take time on the lighter side to look at how mathematicians and scientists are portrayed in popular media by viewing and discussing movies that feature math and science themes and individuals.

NOTE: Students must have completed AP Calculus BC to take this course.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Course Delivery Method:Hybrid (Face-to-face & Online)
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:10 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

May Term Internships | May 17-28, 2021

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 28th, 2021 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or mentor, in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form and the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application, the May Term Internship Program Release form, and the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent, and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 19, 2021. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 31, 2021. No proposals will be accepted after March 19, 2021. If you have any additional questions, please see Mr. Aaron Lake in WA 183.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/