May Term 2022 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience for 2022. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 18, 2022 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. There will be no drop or add options for May Term courses. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 18, 2022. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship.
  3. Students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 18, 2022, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  4. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational events not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

Course Descriptions

MT000107 • The Chronicles of Narnia

The series of books by C. S. Lewis has fascinated readers of all ages for several decades. The seven books in the Chronicles of Narnia series will provide much room for class discussion and outside research. The three major motion pictures related to the series will also give opportunities to explore the themes and storylines of the books. Additionally, this course will delve beyond the stories to discuss the story behind the stories and the man behind the stories.

By participating in this course, students will become familiar with C. S. Lewis, a prominent 20th century novelist, academic, and philosopher. Students will analyze important themes represented in the literature of Lewis. Course work will include discussions of each book in the series, student presentations, and viewing of the movies from the series. Outside work will include reading, researching relevant topics, preparing in-class presentations, and writing short papers.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000122 • Appalachia on Film

This course will provide a brief introduction to issues dealing with the Appalachian region, particularly Southern and Central Appalachia. This course will focus primarily on how the region has been perceived in American popular culture through film.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Mark Myers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000173 • Beginning Tennis 101

Do you want to learn how to play tennis? The goal of this class is designed for students with no previous tennis experience. Students will learn how to play tennis, basic tennis strokes, information on the history of tennis and famous tennis players. Participants will need to bring a tennis racquet and two NEW cans of tennis balls. (Students with tennis experience do not need to apply).

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. Susie Cunningham
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • The Best Contemporary Film Directors

This course introduces students to several of the great film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Hong-jin Na, Bong Joon Ho, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are a handful of working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves, and find audiences. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. However, what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:2:00–3:30 p.m. & 5:45–8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000187 • Introduction to Muay Thai

Muay Thai is the cultural martial art of Thailand. It dates back several hundred years and was developed as a form of close combat that used the entire body as a weapon. Since this is an introduction course, participants will not strike or be struck by anyone using force. We will mostly practice the techniques in a shadow-boxing style. Participants should provide a pair of athletic shorts, sneakers, clean socks & t-shirt which will be used during the hands-on, instructional portion of the class. The classroom instruction will just be normal clothes. If you also have a simple jump rope, this would also be beneficial. If you do not have a jump rope, another exercise option will be available.

This course is meant to introduce the participant to self-defense techniques as practiced in Muay Thai that can be used in and out of organized competitions. It is also meant to provide the participant with a physical exercise class as well as a historical perspective of the art of Muay Thai as well as other similar arts.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00–11:00 a.m. & 12:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Bob Smith
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship

Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials. Please direct any questions about May Term Internships to Mr. Aaron Lake in WA 183 and the completed application forms need to be submitted to Ms. Candace Manship in WA 170.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations
MT000228 • Exploring the Apollo Program

This year marks 50 years since the humankind last set foot on the moon (Apollo 17, 1972). Do you know how we got there? In this May Term course, YOU get to choose what aspect of the Space Race you wish to focus on! Through classroom discussion, you will choose an aspect of the Apollo program to research and analyze. The students may choose to do research on the mathematics or physics that was done in order to accomplish rendezvous in orbit, how race or gender came into play in the Space Race, and/or the politics behind the push to land on the moon. Ideas could also be how astronauts were chosen then and now, the cost of the Space Race in dollars and lives, or something completely different. Plan on reading a few books, watching movies and documentaries, and writing a few short papers before doing your final project. Students will gain an understanding of the events leading up to and including the noon landing and will further develop skills in research, critical thinking, analyzing historical context, and creative production.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$12.00 for field trip
Instructor:Ms. Jessica Edrington
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000233 • Escape to Middle-Earth: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Fantasy Epics

Follow the adventures of hobbits, elves, dwarves, and men in a timeless narrative of friendship, duty and the cataclysmic struggle of good versus evil as envisioned by the world-renowned Oxford professor and fantasy writer J.R.R. Tolkien. Students will study Tolkien’s life and influences on his thinking, read and discuss The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy, and compare his works to Peter Jackson’s Hollywood adaptions.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$22.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Dr. Sean Scott
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000234 • French Film

This course is an introduction to French cinema. We will watch films representing a variety of time-periods, subjects, and genres. Directors may include Cocteau, Godard, Truffaut, Marker, Malle, Palcy, Denis, Berri, Jeunet, Boon, and others. I anticipate that we will watch about 10 films and discuss them. This is a discussion-based class. The students will analyze and compare French films, learn about French culture, present information and arguments, write response papers, and participate in discussions. No previous experience in French is required for the class.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required. Students will receive permission forms soon after enrollment is approved.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Maria Slocum
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000237 • Embroidery 101 or How to Relax with Purpose

Embroidery in various forms has existed as long as man has been able to produce fabric. It is the art of decorating material (mainly textile fabric) by means of a needle and thread/yarn. Basic techniques include crewel, cross-stitch (counted and stamped), needlepoint, and quilting. In Embroidery 101, we will learn how to do basic stitches (outlines, satin, backstitch, cross-stitch), as well as learn how to follow the “map” that goes along with completing a cross-stitch project. We will complete two projects during the course of May Term, first a dishtowel that requires the outline, satin, and backstitches and then a stamped cross-stitch project. Students are expected to have two completed projects by the end of the two-week May Term.

This course will be completely hands-on. Students should gain an understanding of the history of this art form and learn how creative, relaxing, mentally stimulating it can be. Students will also see how this skill can be combined with other methods of relaxing (movie watching, conversation with others, tea-drinking) to make free or leisure time relaxing but productive or meaningful. Both experienced and non-experienced stitchers are welcome.

Students will need to purchase their own materials. They will need an Embroidery Hoop, Embroidery Needle, Embroidery Floss, Cross-stitch kit, Blue-striped vintage towel or flour sack towel, Embroidery Stamp, Scissors (Embroidery scissors preferred, but not required). The cost for these supplies will be about $20.00. The instructor has some materials that students will be able to use, but if students would like to choose their own embroidery stamps or kits, they can be purchased on their own.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None – students purchase own supplies
Instructor:Ms. Heather Rogers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000250 • Indie Game Symposium

This class will enable students to explore the diverse and innovative world of independent games. Often the work of single, deeply dedicated artists, and available for a fraction of the price of big-studio games, independent games are sites of experimentation and innovation. The first week will be spent playing and discussing games from a variety of respected creators, as well as reading works of game studies to provide a scholarly frame. Then second week will be dedicated to application: students who are interested in design will be asked to develop a game as their final project – students who are interested in game studies will be asked to produce an analytical project.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:~$3.50 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Phillip Lobo
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000251 • Design & Build an Escape Room

Immerse yourself in a hands-on, creative experience as you and your fellow students design, construct, and then operate for visitors an “escape room” attraction. The wide range of creative experiences including: creative writing, puzzle research and design, logic problems, wood framing, painting, set and props construction, character performance and lighting and sound design.

Together you and your classmates will create two parallel stories of a missing turn-of –the-century Egyptologist and an ancient Egyptian mystery with a lost tomb. You will research, design and build for the visitors to solve/find/build: logic puzzles, number puzzles, hidden pictures, hidden items, optics puzzles, secret puzzle boxes, mini Rube Goldberg machines, map deciphering, secret codes, and other physical and intellectual obstacles. There will also be the sets to build of the 3-4 successive rooms through which the visitors will progress. Finally, you will learn presentation techniques and interactive skills as you introduce the experience, perform characters, and operate the lights, sound, doors, and other mechanics for the visitors.

This is a hands-on building and performance based project, all the work will be done during class time. There will be no homework. No artistic skills are required—just enthusiasm, and a desire to be part of creating something truly unique and memorable.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:18 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for supplies
Instructor:Mr. John Marsh & Mr. Stephen Schuh
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000252 • Introduction to Decentralized Finance

Do you own bitcoin, ethereum, dogecoin or some other cryptocurrency? Have you ever wondered what exactly cryptocurrencies are and why they are used? This is the course for you! We will explore the world of decentralized finance and learn the different between these cryptocurrencies, how they are used, what a block chain is, what decentralized finance is, and much more.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Michael Niemeier
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000253 • Chemistry Lab Work

This course will provide you with the opportunity to examine chemical safety and learn how lab safety plays an important role in a chemistry lab. In addition to cleaning, organizing, and labeling, you will also have an opportunity to test labs that may be used in a future chemistry course. The labs assigned will be commensurate to your chemistry knowledge.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:8 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Ms. ChristyAnn Norton
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000254 • Gender, Literature, & Theory

This course will comprise significant but typically lesser-taught fiction and creative non-fiction by women and non-binary people within the past fifty – seventy years, as well as an overview of gender theory as applied to literature, including but not limited to écriture feminine, gynocriticism, the politics of difference, strategic essentialism, intersectional feminism, masculinity theory, and transgender theory.

NOTE: During class sessions, students will discuss the assigned texts and engage with videos and films to which they can apply the theory; there will also be an occasional guest speaker. Between each session, students will read at least one primary text regarding the theory to be discussed during the next class session, as well as one short story, novella, or excerpt to which they will apply the theory; one or more optional secondary sources explaining the theory and its applications will be offered. Students will also write response papers for each assigned text or texts. At the end of the first week, students will evaluate two or more of the theories. At the end of the second week, students will produce a final project in the form of an explanatory podcast, video, or other multimodal presentation.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Meghan Riley
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000255 • Digital Electronics

A basic understanding of electronics is essential in today’s world considering the impact of electronics. This course will look at the basics of digital technology and how the electronic technology has shifted from analog systems to digital systems. Although much of the current technology is based on digital electronics, analog electronics have some advantages over analog technologies. The course explores the transformation from analog to digital systems with a focus on the applications of Logic Gates. Students will have an opportunity to connect basic electronic circuits and gain an understanding of the theory behind digital electronics. This will give the students an understanding of how technology has evolved from analog to digital and provide the opportunity to relate digital electronics to real-life experiences.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Godfrey Walwema
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000256 • Personal Financial Success in the Modern World

We have all heard “Adulting: 0/10, would not recommend.” However, this course is hoping to give you a lot of the adulting skills education otherwise does not give you, life experience does. We will talk about banking, investing, budgeting, writing checks, paying bills, credit cards, taxes, insurance, cars, cleaning, house and apartment renting and buying, cooking and grocery shopping, health care, and etiquettes. The main grade for this course will be the budgeting project. Some of these will be online tutorials, some guest speakers, some reading in informational books. The goal is for you to finish the course feeling more prepared to take on adulthood (maybe not better about it, but more ready). You can expect to meet for 4 hours each day and work on the project about 2 hours each afternoon, and we will be taking at least two walking field trips, hopefully on nice weather days. If you are looking for a May Term course to rest, relax, and rejuvenate, this is not it. If you are looking for something to give you those skills you are most worried about needing, this is it. Join us!

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$60.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Megan Wright
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000257 • Urban Sketching

An introduction to sketching as a tool for better observing, documenting, and understanding the world around us. Daily sessions will be outside – weather permitting – on Ball State campus and in Muncie neighborhoods, making drawings of what we see and experience. Students of an artistic bent are welcome – but no experience is necessary. All art materials will be provided. Students need to be fit enough to walk extensively on and off campus, and be comfortable with picnic lunches.

Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold
Preferred Classroom:TBA

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

May Term Internships | May 16-27, 2022

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 27, 2022 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or mentor, in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form and the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application, the May Term Internship Program Release form, and the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent, and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 18, 2022. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 31, 2022. No proposals will be accepted after March 18, 2022. If you have any additional questions, please see Mr. Aaron Lake in WA 183.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/