May Term 2019 Catalog

May Term is a unique two-week program which occurs at the conclusion of the spring semester (the last two weeks of May before Memorial Day). It provides students with opportunities to take one in-depth course, to travel, or to participate in a May Term internship experience. Students must successfully earn two 0.5 credits in May Term (one each year) as part of the Academy’s graduation requirements.

All academy students must be enrolled in one May Term experience each academic year. Registration forms must be received by the Academic Affairs office by Friday, March 15, 2019 or you will be assigned a May Term course. When the number of first preferences exceeds the number of spaces available, seats will be filled at random, with priority given to the seniors. Course selections are not processed on a first-come, first-serve basis. No one is allowed to drop or add a May Term course. When the capacity of each class is filled, no other students will be permitted into the closed class. Academy attendance policies and procedures apply to May Term courses and activities.

Click here for the Course Catalog

Click here for information on Internships

Registration Procedures

  1. Students should first view the May Term catalog on the Indiana Academy web site.
  2. Students must complete the May Term registration form on the web site and submit it online by the stated deadline of March 15, 2019. This includes those students who plan on completing a May Term Internship or those who have paid deposits for trips. For example: Japan or Rome.
  3. All students who do not send in the required May Term registration form by the stated deadline of March 15, 2019, will be assigned a May Term Course with no right to change course assignment.
  4. Athletes MUST choose a May Term activity that does not conflict with practices or team events.

May Term Policies

  1. All Indiana Academy students must be enrolled in a May Term course, May Term trip, or an approved May Term Internship as part of their Academy graduation requirements. Ball State University summer session courses, other individually arranged summer school courses, or educational travel not sponsored by the Academy will not satisfy Indiana Academy May Term graduation requirements.
  2. May Term courses are graded A-B-C-D*.
  3. May Term courses are awarded 0.5 elective credits upon successful completion.
  4. All May Term courses are based upon a standard of curricular excellence consistent with the level of challenge, rigor, and reward of courses taught throughout the school year. May Term courses are designed so that tasks directly related to the course will occupy approximately 60 hours of student time with in-class and out of class work and activities over the two weeks. May Term courses are scheduled to meet a minimum of 3 hours per day. Courses that are primarily activity oriented will have additional hours of in-class meeting time. The meeting times listed in the catalog are approximations. Instructors may hold additional required class meetings outside of the scheduled times. May Term Interns must complete 60 hours of on-site work over the two weeks as arranged with their mentor.

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

Course Descriptions

MT000001 • Habitat for Humanity—Holistic Rehabilitation in Greater Muncie
Learn some construction skills and help others at the same time—work for Habitat for Humanity. Greater Muncie Indiana Habitat for Humanity, Inc. is a non-profit organization founded on the beliefs that every person should have a decent, safe and affordable place to live. Habitat works with volunteers from all walks of life to build decent, affordable housing in partnership with families who will live in them. In addition, Habitat staff and volunteers work on rehabilitating existing homes and helping with home maintenance. Most of each day will be filled with physical labor. For example, we may be painting homes, pressure washing homes, landscaping, maintaining yards, building decks or ramps, building walkways (In 2016, we built a walkway with a guide wire so a blind woman could go to her mailbox on her own), or general cleanup. Students must be at least 16 years of age. Consent and insurance information from parents is required. Each student must take his or her own lunch. Students must keep a daily journal and submit it for evaluation. Hours worked in excess of 60 can be used for Community Service. This is a hands-on course. Students will be exposed to the process of volunteering for a community organization and should feel more comfortable in doing so later in their lives.
Prerequisite:Students must be over 16 years of age, and are required to wear shoes/boots that provide sturdy protection for their feet and clothing they don’t mind getting filthy or splattered with paint.
Meeting Time:8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$40.00 per student for transportation
Instructor:Mr. Christopher Reid & Mr. Robert Smith
Preferred Classroom:On-site location
MT000081 • Creative Writing
This is a workshop in imaginative writing, with practice in short fiction, poetry, and drama. You will try your hand at a variety of exercises, write inside and outside of class, allow your classmates and teacher to read your writing, and read some of your writing aloud. You will also read and analyze published examples of writing. To complete the 60 hours required for a May Term class, you’ll spend four hours class and two hours on homework. The teacher’s primary job will be not to judge your writing, but to provide a variety of ways to practice the art and craft and pleasure of creative writing. Writers of all levels, including beginners, are welcome. NOTE: Priority goes to students who have not taken any Academy creative writing class: the semester-long Creative Writing or a quarter class in Writing Fiction or Writing Poetry.

Students should learn a variety of techniques for generating imaginative writing and develop their skill in analyzing and appreciating creative writing. During class, students will discuss, engage in a variety of exercises, and read aloud from their written work. Outside class, the student will write, visit the art museum, and work together to compose, practice and perform an original play.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Margaret Smith
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000084 • Japan Trip
This year, students will go to Japan for a 10-day travel around the country, visiting major cities of Tokyo, Nagoya, Kyoto and Hiroshima across the Honshu Island. The theme of this year’s trip is “technology” and students will be exploring places with technology focus, such as bullet train museum in Nagoya, the opportunity to tour JAXA, NASA equivalent in Japan and a virtual reality theme park in Tokyo. However, they will also explore traditional places such as thousand-year old temples and castles in Kyoto and Nara, as well as places deemed as “must-see” for Americans, such as the Atomic Bomb Memorial in Hiroshima. They will visit the large shopping districts of Tokyo and Osaka, the two biggest cities in Japan, and explore places culturally relevant to Japanese pop culture such as Akihabara and the Studio Ghibli museum. Students will be immersed in Japanese culture, such as sleeping in tatami (bamboo mat) rooms and on Japanese style bedding, eating Japanese food, and have optional activities such as karaoke/visiting a traditional hot springs. Finally, students will have an opportunity to meet Japanese high school students and observe classes for a day. In all, this trip will be an introduction to Japan for students, regardless of Japanese ability, and will infuse with them an appreciation for Japanese culture and language.

Students will keep journals of 200 words per day. Journals will be collected at the end of the trip. Each journal day must reflect specific activity done that day.
Prerequisite:Enrollment limited to those students who have already paid deposits for the trip. Remember – a Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:May 13, 2019 to May 23, 2019 – All Day
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$3,500 for travel expenses
Instructor:Ms. Clara Chi & Ms. Stephanie Nagelkirk
Preferred Classroom:Japan
MT000107 • The Chronicles of Narnia
The release of the three major motion pictures over the last decade renewed interest in The Chronicles of Narnia, but this series of books by C. S. Lewis has fascinated readers of all ages for several decades. The seven books in the series will provide much room for class discussion and outside research. Some dispute exists among scholars as to whether the Narnia world was intended by Lewis to be an allegory. This course will delve beyond the stories to discuss the story behind the stories and the man behind the stories.

By participating in this course, students will become familiar with C. S. Lewis, a prominent 20th century novelist, academic, and philosopher. Students will analyze important themes represented in the literature of Lewis. Course work will include discussions of each book in the series, student presentations, and viewing of the movies from the series. Outside work will include reading, researching relevant topics, preparing in-class presentations, and writing short papers.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:10:00 a.m.–11:00 p.m. & 1:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Kimberly Foltz
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000122 • Appalachia on Film
This course will provide a brief introduction to issues dealing with the Appalachian region, particularly Southern and Central Appalachia. This course will focus primarily on how the region has been perceived in American popular culture through film.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:1:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Mark Myers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000168 • Math & Problem Solving in Popular Strategy Games
This May Term experience will explore the mathematics and problem-solving strategies that are incorporated in the playing, and hopefully winning of board games. A variety of problem-solving strategies in addition to mathematical concepts will be studied and applied in the board games chosen for this two-week adventure. Included among these are optimization strategies, cooperative game strategies, risk vs. reward strategies, deductive reasoning, spatial orientation, and graph theory.

We will meet as a group 3 hours a day; you will independently meet 3 hours per day and keep a log of the time spent playing the games. Each individual will be required to submit a two-page report on one of their favorite games played during the week. In this report, you should include a brief description of the game itself, why you liked playing the game, and explanation of the math and/or problem-solving strategies you and/or others used to try to win the game, and which strategies seemed to be successful and which ones were not.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 to purchase games
Instructor:Mr. Joshua Ruark
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000173 • Beginning Tennis 101
The goal of this class is designed for students with no previous tennis experience. Students will learn how to play tennis, basic tennis strokes, information on the history of tennis and famous tennis players. Participants will need to bring a tennis racquet and a NEW can of tennis balls. (Students with tennis experience do not need to apply).
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$5.00 for transportation
Instructor:Ms. Susie Cunningham
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000183 • Great Contemporary Film Directors
This course introduces students to several of the great film directors working today. Paul Thomas Anderson, Wong Kar-Wai, David Fincher, Wes Anderson, Hong-jin Na, Kathryn Bigelow, David Robert Mitchell, and Jennifer Kent are working film directors who continue to make films that win awards and earn critical raves. They are all masterful film technicians who make entertaining movies with swooshing cameras and wonderful soundtracks and awesome performances by both well-known and lesser-known actors. However, what else do these directors accomplish? Do they tap into contemporary psychological preoccupations? Do they touch a nerve in audiences through their chosen subjects? What are the concerns of our best working directors? Most great artists are worried about something. What worries our best directors? This May Term course poses these and many more questions. Through daily screenings, writings, and discussions, students can expect to become familiar with the work of these directors and begin to understand the bigger issues at work in their films.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:2:00–3:30 p.m. & 5:45–8:45 p.m.
Enrollment:15 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. David Haynes
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000189 • Challenge and Adventure
This course is designed to make you think outside the box, work with teammates, and be creative. Each class day, we will be working together to build a supportive team atmosphere, occasionally competing to determine whose design or build was better at achieving objectives, going on both walking and driving adventures, and getting creative juices flowing. You will have to adapt to a new challenge or adventure each day, and must come to class with a positive attitude, ready to be supportive and collaborative. Enthusiasm and the willingness to adjust to new situations are absolutely required for this course.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$90.00 for field trips & activities
Instructor:Mrs. Megan Wright
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000194 • Technology in the Movies
40 years of Star Wars — This class will look at how technology is used in the movies and how it has changed over the years in Star Wars. We will start out where I started back in 1977 with the release of the film Star Wars. The successful sequels of The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Return of the Jedi (1983) followed it. Next the Prequel trilogy will be shown with The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones, and then Revenge of the Sith. Finally, The Force Awakens, The Last Jedi, and Rogue One will finish out the movie selection. There will be some shorts in here of how things were created for the movies. This class will also use May Term to complete the yearbook.

The class will be watching one movie each day and then discussion about what we saw technology-wise in each movie. Each student will also write a 3- to 5-page paper over a topic I assign in class each day and work on the yearbook each day.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Jon Grady
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000204 • Introduction to Aquatic Biology
Have you ever wondered what kinds of creatures live in your neighborhood ponds, lakes and streams? Do you like being outside and do not mind getting wet/muddy? Are you concerned about clean water and/or a healthy environment? Well, then, Introduction to Aquatic Biology is the course for you! We will cover information regarding just about anything that lives in fresh water: from Anabaena sp. to zebra mussels; and ephemeral ponds to raging rivers. This course will focus on aquatic ecology with hands-on activities in both the laboratory and in the field (or more accurately – in the water!). We will meet daily from 9:00 a.m. until about 4:00 p.m., and each day may consist of lecture, lab activities, discussions, and/or field trips. We have three off-campus field trips planned for this class. The field trips include physical activity that may be strenuous at times, but the relatively physically fit academy student should be able to keep up.
Prerequisite:The ability to swim.
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$30.00 for field trip expenses
Instructor:Dr. Diane Kallmeyer
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000214 • May Term Internship
Please see the Indiana Academy website for the requirements and application for a May Term Internship. Follow the directions and remember you still need to submit your Course Request Form along with the May Term Internship application materials.
Prerequisite:A Course Request form must be turned in as your first choice plus four other course selections.
Meeting Time:All Day
Enrollment:Unlimited
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Aaron Lake (Coordinator)
Preferred Classroom:On-Site Locations
MT000227 • Sketching History: Past – Present – Future
How can we better see and understand the world around us? How can we better imagine, and understand, the past? How can we better imagine the world of our futures? This course proposes to explore, if not answer, those questions through onsite sketching and drawing.

Students will learn basic sketching techniques to observe and record their impressions of what Ball State campus and Muncie, Indiana look and feel like today. There will be extensive walking most days, as long as the weather is reasonably dry, to find interesting sketching locations on campus and off campus.

After students gain confidence and skill in drawing Muncie today, the class will move on to produce drawings, imagining, or reconstructing these same landscapes in the past. We will return Muncie to the era of thriving factories, and even remember the “mammoth steppe” of the Pleistocene, before the end of the last Ice Age and the arrival of human beings.

Finally, the class will turn to imaging Muncie in the future. Will the buildings of Ball State someday be ruins, like the factories of old Muncie today? What if the crises of the larger, outside world, someday come to pass in the American heartland? We will imagine a Muncie of checkpoints, dividing walls, and refugee camps. What would climate change mean, perhaps, for the landscapes of Muncie? What will the “Muncie” of the far future look like, in a thousand years – or a million?

This course will be a hands-on participation experience, through there will be some traditional classroom instruction regarding historical content. Students will be exposed to basic techniques in landscape and architectural sketching and drawing. The students will explore historical changes in the American landscape, and will imagine both past and future landscapes. This course is scheduled to meet daily from 9:30 am until about 4:00 pm, but may be adjusted depending on weather.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$20.00 for supplies
Instructor:Dr. Thomas Arnold
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000228 • Exploring the Apollo Program
This year marks 50 years since the first moon landing, but do you know how we got there? In this May Term course, YOU get to choose what aspect of the Space Race you wish to focus on! Through classroom discussion, you will choose an aspect of the Apollo program to research and analyze. The students may choose to do research on the mathematics or physics that was done in order to accomplish rendezvous in orbit, how race or gender came into play in the Space Race, and/or the politics behind the push to land on the moon. Ideas could also be how astronauts were chosen then and now, the cost of the Space Race in dollars and lives, or something completely different. Plan on reading a few books, watching movies and documentaries, and writing a few short papers before doing your final project. Students will gain an understanding of the events leading up to and including the noon landing and will further develop skills in research, critical thinking, analyzing historical context, and creative production.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$12.00 for field trip
Instructor:Ms. Jessica Edrington
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000229 • Physical Optics
This course is the study of light based on it wave nature. Light exhibits many interesting properties due to its wave nature. These include Interference, Diffraction, and Polarization. The course will thus cover study of these properties. The course will involve lecture discussion, solving problems, and a presentation at the end of the term.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:12:00–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Mr. Hasan Fakhruddin
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000230 • Chemistry Forensics Lab
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the forensic tools used in a typical forensic lab including hair analysis, blood spatter, fingerprint analysis and shoeprint analysis. The chemistry behind each of these processes will also be examined. To deepen their understanding of these processes and how they are used in real cases, students will also research and report on four case studies in which each of these processes help “cinch” the suspect, or in some cases, identified the incorrect suspect. Additionally, students will generate a book report (a list of possible book options will be provided) that examines offender’s crimes and how they were finally apprehended.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$38.00 for supplies
Instructor:Ms. Chris Norton
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000231 • A Short Course in Combinatorics
Permutations, combinations, inclusion/exclusion, Pascal’s Triangle, derangements, Binomial Theorem, graphs and trees, partitions, generating functions.
Prerequisite:Precalculus for AP 2 or equivalent, and an interest in mathematics.
Meeting Time:10:00–11:30 a.m. & 1:30–3:00 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$35.00 for textbooks and supplies
Instructor:Mr. John Rajca
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000232 • Out from Under Gogol’s Overcoat
The course title refers to a quote said about the Russian writers who came after Nikolai Gogol, whose short story The Overcoat set a much different tone for the great period of the Russian novel that was to come. In this course, we will explore several of the unique short stories by Nikolai Gogol, including but not limited to Nevsky Prospect, The Nose, The Overcoat and then onto Feodor Dostoevsky’s great novel Crime and Punishment, which expands on many of the themes that Gogol presents in his works. We will compare the two authors, explore the political and social condition of Russia in the mid 19th century, and even discover the seeds of the Russian Revolution that was to come in the next century. Note: The literature we read will be taught in English translation, so this course is open to everybody.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$25.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Ms. Heather Rogers
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000233 • Escape to Middle-Earth: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Fantasy Epics
Follow the adventures of hobbits, elves, dwarves, and men in a timeless narrative of friendship, duty and the cataclysmic struggle of good versus evil as envisioned by the world-renowned Oxford professor and fantasy writer J. R. R. Tolkien. Students will study Tolkien’s life and influences on his thinking, read and discuss The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings trilogy, and compare his works to Peter Jackson’s Hollywood adaptions.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m.
Enrollment:16 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$22.00 for textbooks
Instructor:Dr. Sean Scott
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000234 • French Film
This course is an introduction to French and francophone cinema. We will watch films representing a variety of time-periods, subjects, and genres. Directors may include Godard, Truffaut, Marker, Malle, Palcy, Denis and others. I anticipate that we will watch about 8-10 films and discuss them. This is a discussion-based class. The students will analyze and compare French films, learn about French culture, present information and arguments, write response papers, and participate in discussions.

Note: This course will require parental permission from every enrolled student. Films/books/and classroom discussion may contain adult content in some form, whether it be violence, sex, drugs, language, or all the above. Even if the student is 17 or 18, parental permission will be required.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:11:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
Enrollment:14 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:None
Instructor:Dr. Maria Slocum
Preferred Classroom:TBA
MT000235 • Trip to Rome/Italy
We will spend 7 days touring Rome and its environs. Students will explore ancient ruins, medieval cathedrals, and the intersections of historical remains with modern-day Roman culture. While the trip is ideal for Latin students and students of ancient history, all students are welcome to apply. For students who have experience with Latin and/or ancient history, special sessions will be given in situ which will integrate primary sources with the places we will be visiting. For students with little or no experience in the subjects, other educational experiences – composing a travel journal and investigating travel narratives as a genre, for example – will be provided. We will prepare for the trip by learning “survival Italian,” brushing up on modern-day Roman culture, and reading about the sites we will be visiting. After the trip, students will compose and present their own accounts of their experiences, e.g. by presenting a travel journal, a photo narrative, or an informational guide to one of the sites.
Prerequisite:None
Meeting Time:May 13, 2019 & May 23-24, 2019: 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–3:00 p.m.
May 14-22, 2019: All Day
Enrollment:12 students
Grades to be Assigned:A–D*
Fees:$4,000 for travel expenses for supplies
Instructor:Mr. Evan Ward
Preferred Classroom:Rome/Italy

Click here for the May Term Course Selection Form.

May Term Internships | May 13-24, 2019

During May Term, the Indiana Academy will be offering academic credit for students who are interested in working at either a site on campus, one at their home communities, or at another location. A minimum of 60 hours must be completed for a May Term Internship. Work hours may include weekend or evening hours. Some job sites may require a background check, drug testing or other types of training before work can begin. Students should plan to complete these requirements before starting their May Term Internship.

Seniors must plan to return to campus by noon on May 24th, 2019 to attend the MANDATORY graduation rehearsal.

The May Term Internship program matches students with professionals to allow an exploration experience in the student’s area of interest. The student is expected to complete actual projects. The May Term Internship experience should not be along the lines of errand running or other types of busy work.

In order to arrange an Internship during the May Term, the student must complete the following:

  1. Contact a person, or “mentor,” in the student’s area of interest and discuss the internship experience. The student is responsible for making the necessary arrangements including housing and transportation.
  2. Complete the internship application and give the hours the student expects to work and the type of experience they would like to have. Be realistic about the expectations of the internship program and the mentor. The student may NOT work under the supervision of relatives or be paid for their services.
  3. Prepare a one- to two-page proposal describing the company or person who will act as the mentor, the reason for pursuing the internship, and what the student would like to gain from the experience. The proposal should be attached to the May Term Internship Application form.
  4. Fill out and return the May Term Internship Program Release form.
  5. An Academy faculty member will contact the mentor to confirm the internship arrangements, follow the progress of the student at work, and to get information for evaluating the student’s performance. For communication purposes, students should plan to maintain an e-mail contact with their Academy faculty member during the May Term internship. It is expected that students will file a daily journal with the faculty supervisor by e-mail giving their hours of work, a description of the work accomplished that day, and reflections about their work experience. The faculty member may also ask for phone numbers (e.g. student’s cell number) for contact purposes.
  6. The May Term Internship Application; the May Term Internship Program Release form; the Health Information & Delegation of Consent for Treatment form, signed by both the student and the parent; and the one- to two-page Proposal should be submitted to Mrs. Candace Manship in the Office of Academic Affairs in WA 170 by March 15, 2019. Faculty supervisors will review the proposals and final decisions will be made by March 29, 2019. No proposals will be accepted after March 15, 2019.

Download the Apprenticeship Student Evaluation form.

https://academy.bsu.edu/academics/may-term/may-term-catalog/